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Beibeilong sinensis
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Identity of famous baby dinosaur fossil revealed

The fossil of a baby dinosaur discovered in China more than 25 years ago has formally been identified as a new species of feathered dinosaur.
The hatchling, dubbed Baby Louie, was found within a nest of dinosaur eggs.
Palaeontologists have called it Beibeilong sinensis, which translates to "Chinese baby dragon".
They say it is the first known specimen of a gigantic bird-like dinosaur belonging to the group known as oviraptorosaurs.

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Anchiornis
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'Best ever' view of what a dinosaur really looked like

A dinosaur that lived 160 million years ago had drumstick-shaped legs much like living birds, according to palaeontologists.
The feathered dinosaur also had bird-like arms similar to wings.
Scientists used high-powered lasers to reveal invisible details of what the creature looked like.
The research could give insights into the origins of flight, which is thought to have evolved more than 150 million years ago.

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Feathered Dinosaur
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'Beautiful' dinosaur tail found preserved in amber

The tail of a feathered dinosaur has been found perfectly preserved in amber from Myanmar. The one-of-a-kind discovery helps put flesh on the bones of these extinct creatures, opening a new window on the biology of a group that dominated Earth for more than 160 million years.
Examination of the specimen suggests the tail was chestnut brown on top and white on its underside.

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RE: Sleeping Dinosaur
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Chinese archaeologists find clues about appearance of early birds, dinosaurs

Chinese archaeologists have discovered molecular evidence of the protein keratin in a bird fossil from the Cretaceous Period 130 million years ago, which may provide clues about the colour of feathered dinosaurs and early birds.
The research paper by experts with the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology under the Chinese Academy of Sciences was published by America's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on Tuesday.

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Bird feathers
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Dino-bird fossil had sparkly feathers 'to attract mate'

An extinct bird that lived about 120 million years ago had iridescent feathers that it may have used to attract a mate, fossil evidence shows.
The prehistoric bird, which was found recently in China, may have puffed up its feathers like a pea****.
The bird's feathers are "remarkably preserved", including the chemical that gave them sparkle.

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Tongtianlong limosus
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The dinosaur almost blown to oblivion

A newly discovered species of dinosaur has been identified from an extraordinarily complete fossil almost destroyed by dynamite.
Preserved raising its beaked head, with feathered wings outstretched, in the mud it was mired in when it died 72 million years ago.
It has been named Tongtianlong limosus, "muddy dragon on the road to heaven"

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RE: Sleeping Dinosaur
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Fossil sheds light on evolution of birdsong

Scientists have reconstructed the "voicebox" of an extinct bird that lived at the time of the dinosaurs.
The bird may have honked, quacked or whistled, like a duck or goose.
Investigation of the oldest-known fossil of a bird's vocal organ - the syrinx - gives clues to how birdsong evolved.

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Analysis of fossilised Antarctic bird's 'voice box' suggests dinosaurs couldn't sing

The oldest-known vocal organ of a bird has been found in an Antarctic fossil that is related to ducks and geese and lived during the age of the dinosaurs, more than 66 million years ago.
The discovery of the Mesozoic Era vocal organ -- called a syrinx -- and its apparent absence in non-avian dinosaur fossils of the same age indicates that the organ may have originated late in the evolution of birds, and that other dinosaurs may not have been able to make noises similar to the bird calls we hear today. The findings were published today in the journal Nature.

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MSU paleontologists publish paper in ornithological journal linking dinosaur, bird reproduction

A recent theory by paleontologists at Montana State University suggests that the nesting habits of some Mesozoic-era dinosaurs further bolsters the theory that all birds, from the majestic bald eagles of Yellowstone National Park to robins nesting in backyards across Montana, evolved from dinosaurs that lived millions of years ago.
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Zhenyuanlong suni
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Dinosaur find: Velociraptor ancestor was 'winged dragon'

Scientists have discovered a winged dinosaur - an ancestor of the velociraptor - that they say was on the cusp of becoming a bird.
The 6ft 6in (2m) creature was almost perfectly preserved in limestone, thanks to a volcanic eruption that had buried it in north-east China.
And the 125-million year-old fossil suggests many other dinosaurs, including velociraptors, would have looked like "big, fluffy killer birds".

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