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'Faceless' fish, last seen in 1873, found off Australia

A "faceless" deep-sea fish not seen for more than a century has been rediscovered by a team of international scientists while they researched the depths of a massive abyss off Australia's east coast.
The mission called "Sampling the Abyss", launched by Museums Victoria, also found species believed to be new to science.

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'Surprise' discovery of Europe's first cave-dwelling fish

Pink, scaleless and with declining vision, the cave loach is the first ever example of a fish found living in a cave in Europe.
Researchers say the creature was found by divers in a huge underground cavern in southern Germany.
Experts believe that these loaches are the most northerly species of cave fish ever discovered.

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Just ~436,900,000 cod left in the North Sea

The Daily Telegraph recently ran the headline: "Just 100 cod left in the North Sea". It sounded fishy. Trawlermen were furious.
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Scientists discover new species in one of world's deepest ocean trenches

Scientists investigating in one of the worlds deepest ocean trenches - previously thought to be void of fish - have discovered an entirely new species.
Oceanlab scientists revealed a new species of snailfish living at 7000m, never before caught or captured on camera Large crustacean scavengers were discovered living at depths of 8000m for the first time Large crustacean scavengers Mass group of a species of cusk-eel - known as Ophidiids Dr Alan Jamieson
The findings by a team of marine biologists from Aberdeen, Tokyo and New Zealand, have shed new light on life in the deepest places on Earth and the global distribution of fish in our oceans.
The expedition to the Peru-Chile trench in the South East Pacific Ocean revealed a new species of snailfish living at 7000m, never before caught or captured on camera.

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A carp believed to be Britain's biggest native freshwater fish has died aged 45.

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A "giant herring" measuring 3.5 metres has been discovered off Sweden's western coast -- the first such fish found in the Scandinavian country in more than 130 years, a maritime museum said today.
The Regalecus glesne, known as the King of Herrings or Giant Oarfish, was found dead in the small fishing village of Bovallstrand on Sweden's west coast, about 90 kilometres from the Norwegian border.

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An incredibly rare blind fish that lives underground in Brazil has been rediscovered by scientists.
A number of individual fish have been found almost 50 years after the only known specimen was collected and then described by American experts.
Biologists cannot be sure, but they suspect the fish may be a living relict that has survived deep under the ground while its relatives above went extinct.

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New fossils reveal a previously unknown dynasty of giant plankton-eating fishes that filled the seas of the Jurassic and Cretaceous, a team led by Oxford University scientists report.
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Prehistoric seas were filled with giant plankton-eating fish which died out at the same time as the dinosaurs, new fossil evidence suggests.
Scientists from Glasgow, Oxford and the United States have identified fossil evidence which shows the fish existed between 66 and 172 million years ago.
They believe it may be a "missing piece in the evolutionary story of fish, mammals and ocean ecosystems".

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Fish fossils fill gaps in dinosaur-era ocean food chains.

The first large filter feeders swam in the oceans for much longer than previously thought.
In a study published today in Science, Matt Friedman, a palaeobiologist at the University of Oxford, UK, and his colleagues identify filter feeders in fossils spanning more than 100 million years and originating in Asia, Europe and North America. The discovery is a result of examining fossils from museums around the world that had either not been studied or had been misinterpreted.

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