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L

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When did the Andes mountains form?

The prevailing view is that the Andes became a mountain range between ten to six million years ago when a huge volume of rock dropped off the base of the Earths crust in response to over-thickening of the crust in this region. When this large portion of dense material was removed, the remaining portion of the crust underwent rapid uplift.
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Millions of people living near the Andes Mountains face a significantly higher risk of a giant earthquake than previously thought, and such a temblor could be more than 10 times stronger than anything the region has expected in the past.
Scientists investigated the Subandean margin along the eastern flank of the Andes Mountains, an area that includes Bolivia. A recent hazard assessment estimated a maximum earthquake there of magnitude 7.5.

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Andes rise was gradual, not abrupt

Trailing like a serpent's spine along the western coast of South America, the Andes are the worlds longest continental mountain range and the highest range outside Asia, with an average elevation of 13,000 feet.
The question of how quickly the mountains attained such heights has been a contentious one in geological circles, with some researchers claiming the central Andes rose abruptly to nearly their current height and others maintaining the uplift was a more gradual process.

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L

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Andes
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Trailing like a serpent's spine along the western coast of South America, the Andes are the world's longest continental mountain range and the highest range outside Asia, with an average elevation of 13,000 feet.
The question of how quickly the mountains attained such heights has been a contentious one in geological circles, with some researchers claiming the central Andes rose abruptly to nearly their current height and others maintaining the uplift was a more gradual process.
New research by U-M paleoclimatologist Christopher Poulsen and colleagues suggests that the quick-rise view is based on misinterpreted evidence. What some geologists interpret as signs of an abrupt rise are actually indications of ancient climate change, the researchers say. Their findings are scheduled to be published online April 1 in Science Express.

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The Andes
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The Andes were formed 120 million years ago; but in geological terms, this giant of South America is more like a teenager going through growth problems.
A new study by a group of Argentine researchers suggests that the largest mountain chain on the American continent is not as quiet as it seems.
According to Folguera Andres and Victor Ramos, geologists in the Faculty of Natural Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires (UBA), some mountains are losing altitude.

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