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TOPIC: Photography


L

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RE: Photography
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Phil Hart  - Under the Stars

The Venus and Jupiter Show

In early 2012 I spent nine weeks based in Canada's Yukon Territory on the biggest astronomy and photography adventure I've ever tackled. The primary reason for going all the way up to the Yukon was of course to photograph the northern lights. But the conjunction between Venus and Jupiter in February/March provided a nice sideshow. So consider this a teaser video before I can produce something more from the three and half terabytes of aurora timelapse footage that I captured.
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L

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Lunar Photography
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The full moon itself though can be a lot of fun to look at and even take pictures of. You can take any camera and point it at the moon and take a shot and get some pretty good pictures, especially when you can zoom in on it. Of course, some cameras are better than others.
Did you know that you can take some amazing pictures of the moon through even a small to moderate telescope? To be quite honest with you, I didn't really know how good they can be, but Jenny Winston, a 15-year-old sophomore who helps me out at some of my larger star parties, has taken some amazing shots.

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L

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Astrophotography
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Sidney Rosenthal collects clouds.
Ionised, interstellar gas clouds, to be exact.
Each autumn, the Pensacola dentist lugs his large Takahashi telescope into his backyard, where it will remain - sturdily mounted - for the next six months. Trailed by laptop cables, he fiddles with various knobs, levers and lenses until the settings are just right.

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L

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RE: Photography
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Plains Milky Way

During the month of May, I shot Milky Way timelapse in central South Dakota when I had the time, and the weather cooperated. The biggest challenge was cloudy nights and the wind. There were very few nights, when I could shoot, that were perfectly clear, and often the wind was blowing 25mph +. That made it hard to get the shots I wanted. I kept most of the shots low to the ground, so the wind wouldnt catch the setup
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L

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Astrophotography
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Taking Pictures with a Telescope is Gaining Popularity
Good astronomy equipment is more accessible and more affordable than ever. As such, the interest in astrophotography has spiked in recent years. Getting started in astrophotography is appealing to a lot of people, but most of them have no clue what this hobby entails. To remedy this problem, Buy-Telescope.com has just released a free ebook titled "An Introduction to Astrophotography" which will get any astronomy nut started on the right track.
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RE: Photography
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Tomorrow night, December 20/21, 2010, will bring one of the rarest and most spectacular of all celestial phenomenon: a total lunar eclipse. So, with a few years separation being the typical average for an eclipse in any given location, it is only natural that people will want to try and photograph the rare, red Moon.
So, how does one go about doing this through a telescope?
Well, the big issue is coupling your camera to the scope in the first place. The good news is that this is actually very easy to do, the biggest challenge will be tracking down the stuff in a day and a half. In reality, you only need two things to transform your telescope into a giant camera lens: a camera-specific T-ring and a universal T-adapter.
First, the T-ring, which is the part that actually couples directly onto your camera. Specific to your camera's particular mount, whether it be Canon EF, Nikon F, or anything else for that matter, the key here is to buy a ring that will fit your camera as it will attach just like a lens will by locking into the mount. Unfortunately, you won't be able to attach the camera to the scope just yet, which requires part 2: the universal T-adapter.



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L

Posts: 131433
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Astrophotography
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The UtahAstronomy e-mail discussion group recently hosted an exchange about the accuracy of astrophotos.
Let's begin by ignoring the deeper issues, such as whether colour actually exists in space. When you consider that light is electromagnetic radiation moving in all directions, both particle and wave, at 186,000 miles per second, it becomes apparent that shape and colour of distant objects do not exist except as they are perceived; that is, focused by an eye or lens. But the colours and shapes are real in that cameras and telescopes operated anywhere can produce similar images of given targets. This subject was kicked around by the UA group in the past, and it's an interesting topic, but the latest talk isn't about that.

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L

Posts: 131433
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Celestial Photography
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As well as you can see celestial goodies through any size of telescope, a camera in place of your eyes with its lens opened up for just a few seconds will "see" a lot more colour and detail.
One of the biggest disappointments people have when they buy a telescope is that they don't see the same detail and colour that is seen in astronomical photographs. It's not your telescope, it's your eye's inability to accumulate light the same way a camera does.
A camera or imaging device hooked up to a telescope with an exposure of even a few seconds can show you a lot more detail and colour.

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Astrophotography
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Shelton man's backyard telescope lets him photograph heavenly bodies 400 million light years away
Bob Runyan of Shelton has been a backyard astronomer for years. About seven years ago, he also began astrophotography - capturing images of stars and galaxies millions of light years from Earth.

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Astronomical Imaging
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Ryan Hannahoe, director of client support services with the Fair Dinkum Skies Observatory and an MSU student, will discuss "Astronomical Imaging: The Point When Art Breaks Through Science" at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 24, in the Museum of the Rockies' Hager Auditorium.
The lecture is free and open to the public.

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