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RE: Ancient Mega-Tsunamis
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Ancient Tsunamis from Meteorite Impacts: Evidence, Interpretation, Modelling, and Controversy

Large tsunamis are devastating events and have been in the public eye in the past 10 years because of the terrible tsunami-related devastation caused by the Great Sumatra earthquake in 2004 and the Great East Japan earthquake in 2011. Because of these recent events, the association between tsunamis and extremely powerful earthquakes is strong in peoples' minds. Tsunamis, which are trains of waves produced by displacement of large bodies of water, can be produced by seismic disturbance of the sea floor. However, lots of other natural events can cause water displacements to take place both in the ocean or in large lakes. Some of these include underwater volcanic eruptions, glaciers calving, underwater landslides, and landslides that enter a body of water.
Some of the most enormous tsunamis that Earth has ever experienced may be related to large meteorites, or bolides, that fall into the ocean. The relationship of bolide impacts to tsunamis, particularly the impact at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary (~65 million years ago) that caused the mass extinction of dinosaurs, has been suggested by a number of geologists, but is not without controversy.

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Ireland has 'potential' to be hit by tsunami
It has happened before - and it could happen again. Irelands coastline could be struck by a huge tsunami triggered by any one of a number of events.

"Yes we do have the potential for a tsunami because we have been hit in the past" - Prof Mike Williams of NUI Galway.

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Mega tsunami likely hit Tonga in past
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A team of US scientists have found evidence a mega tsunami hit Tonga in the past few thousand years and said another giant wave could strike the region again.
The scientists from the University of Texas studied massive boulders of coral found up to 400 metres from the shoreline on Tonga's main island Tongatapu.
Team leader Dr Matthew Hornbach said it was likely the boulders were deposited when a nearby underwater volcano caused a land-slip, resulting in a tsunami.

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RE: Ancient Mega-Tsunamis
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Scientist managed to discover signs of ancient devastation on an isolated tropical island located in the South Pacific Ocean. Seven huge boulders made of coral were found on the flat island of Tongatapu, the main island of Tonga. These stones have the same composition as the reefs that line the coast and geologists consider these are the largest boulders ever dumped by a mega-tsunami, a large wall of water that is 130 feet high and which stormed onto the island thousands of years ago.
In 2007 they found an unnamed underwater volcano, located 22 miles west of the island. After analysing the sides of the volcano, researchers discovered that a three-mile-long section of its edge probably collapsed, generating a wave 130 feet high that stormed ashore.

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The BBC and the National Geographic Channel are making a documentary based on the controversial theories of a Wollongong academic, who claims that meteorites hit the earth every 1000 years.
New York-based production company Pangolin Pictures has been filming for the documentary this week at Greenfields Beach, near Vincentia, in a cave at Jones Beach, Kiama Downs and at Bass Point, Shellharbour.
The documentary, Ancient Mega-Tsunamis, is based on the theories of University of Wollongong associate professor Ted Bryant and the Holocene Impact Working Group, a collective of scientists from the United States, Russia, France, Ireland and Australia.

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