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Title: Hubble Space Telescope detection of the double pulsar system J0737-3039 in the far-ultraviolet
Author: Martin Durant, Oleg Kargaltsev, George G Pavlov

We report on detection of the double pulsar system J0737-3039 in the far-UV with the ACS/SBC detector aboard HST. We measured the energy flux F = 4.5+/-1.0e-17 erg cm-2s-1 in the 1250-1550 AA band, which corresponds to the extinction-corrected luminosity L~1.5e28 erg s-1 for the distance d=1.1 kpc and a plausible reddening E(B-V)=0.1. If the detected emission comes from the entire surface of one of the neutron stars with a 13 km radius, the surface blackbody temperature is in the range T~2-5e5 K for a reasonable range of interstellar extinction. Such a temperature requires an internal heating mechanism to operate in old neutron stars, or it might be explained by heating of the surface of the less energetic Pulsar B by the relativistic wind of Pulsar A. If the far-UV emission is non-thermal (e.g., produced in the magnetosphere of Pulsar A), its spectrum exhibits a break between the UV and X-rays.

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Title: Constraining the optical emission from the double pulsar system J0737-3039
Authors: F. R. Ferraro, R. P. Mignani, C. Pallanca, E. Dalessandro, B. Lanzoni, A. Pellizzoni, A. Possenti, M. Burgay, F. Camilo, N. D'Amico, A. G. Lyne, M. Kramer, R. N. Manchester

We present the first optical observations of the unique system J0737-3039 (composed of two pulsars, hereafter PSR-A and PSR-B). Ultra-deep optical observations, performed with the High Resolution Camera of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope could not detect any optical emission from the system down to m_F435W=27.0 and m_F606W=28.3. The estimated optical flux limits are used to constrain the three-component (two thermal and one non-thermal) model recently proposed to reproduce the XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum. They suggest the presence of a break at low energies in the non-thermal power law component of PSR-A and are compatible with the expected black-body emission from the PSR-B surface. The corresponding efficiency of the optical emission from PSR-A's magnetosphere would be comparable to that of other Myr-old pulsars, thus suggesting that this parameter may not dramatically evolve over a time-scale of a few Myr.

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Google earth file: PSR J0737-3039.kmz (1kb, kmz)

Position(2000): RA 07h 37 51.247, Dec -30░ 39' 40.74"



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PSR J0737-3039 is a binary pulsar system discovered in 2003, the first known double pulsar.

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XMM-Newton has, for the first time, detected signals from both stars of a binary pulsar system in X-rays, unveiling a scientific goldmine. Each star of the closely-packed system is a dense neutron star, spinning extremely fast, radiating X-rays in pulses.
áThe binary pulsar PSR J0737-3039 was first spotted by astronomers in 2003 in radio wavelengths. X-rays can be used to probe deeper and study the system more thoroughly.
To see two pulsars orbiting each other in a binary system is extremely rare in itself. PSR J0737-3039 contains a slowly-rotating lazy neutron star (pulsar B) orbiting a faster and more energetic companion (pulsar A).
Each pulsar or neutron star is the fast-rotating, dead heart of a once-massive star.

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