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Identifying the Volcanic Eruption Depicted in a Neolithic Painting at Catalhöyük, Central Anatolia, Turkey

A mural excavated at the Neolithic Catalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey) has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to ~6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dag twin-peaks volcano located ~130 km northeast of Catalhöyük, and a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground. This interpretation, however, has remained controversial not least because independent evidence for a contemporaneous explosive volcanic eruption of Hasan Dag has been lacking. Here, we document the presence of andesitic pumice veneer on the summit of Hasan Dag, which we dated using (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology.
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Ancient mural may be first picture of volcanic blast

Was humanity's first depiction of a volcanic eruption daubed on the wall of a house in Turkey 8500 years ago? Geological evidence now supports this controversial claim.
In 1963, archaeologist James Mellaart found a large mural on the wall of a house in Catalhöyük, the largest known Stone Age town. He interpreted it as depicting a plan layout of the town's dwellings with a twin-peaked volcano, Hasan DaG, looming behind - captured dramatically in the process of erupting.

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Secrets of Turkey's Catalhöyük to be revealed this summer

The latest findings uncovered during the ongoing excavations at Catalhöyük, one of the oldest settlement areas in human history, will be revealed to the world at the end of the summer. A member of the international archaeological team says the results will be published and discussed in a scientific environment
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In the May of 1961 British archaeologist James Mellaart rolled up at the foot of a prominent, 15-hectare mound rising an impressive 20 meters above a sun-baked, dusty plain. Known to the locals as Catalhöyük or "Forked Road Mound," it lay just outside the village of Cumra, a short drive from Konya, on Turkey's rolling Anatolia plateau.
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Archeological site Catalhöyük now protected
Catalhöyük will be protected from rain and other weather changes by a large wooden roof.
The elements are no longer able to weather away at Catalhöyük, one of the oldest known sites of human settlement, now that the construction of a large wooden protective roof has been completed.

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Çatalhöyük: a Stone Age city
In 1961 the British archaeologist James Mellaart began excavating a 20-meter-high hüyük (a mound built of man-made debris, otherwise known as a tel) in the Konya Plain, near the small town of Çumra. Although he failed to unearth either a cave girl's fur bikini or a stone TV, what he did discover over the next four years was every bit as exciting as fiction. Çatalhöyük turned out to be one of the most important sites not only in Turkey, but in the world.

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