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Post Info TOPIC: CFBDS J005910.83-011401.3


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CFBDS J005910.90-011401.3.kmz
Google Sky file (1kb, kmz)

Position(2000): RA 00:59:10.903, Dec -01:14:01.13

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Title: CFBDS J005910.90-011401.3: reaching the T-Y Brown Dwarf transition?
Authors: Philippe Delorme (LAOG), Xavier Delfosse (LAOG, OSUG), Loic Albert (CFHT), Etienne. Artigau, Thierry Forveille (LAOG, OSUG, CFHT), Céline Reylé (LAOB), France Allard (CRAL), Derek Homeier, Annie Robin (LAOB), Chris J. Willott, Michael Liu (IfA), Trent Dupuy (IfA)
(Version v2)

We report the discovery of CFBDS J005910.90-011401.3 (hereafter CFBDS0059), the coolest brown dwarf identified to date. We found CFBDS0059 using i' and z' images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), and present optical and near-infrared photometry, Keck laser guide star adaptive optics imaging, and a complete near-infrared spectrum, from 1.0 to 2.2 \mu m. A side to side comparison of the near-infrared spectra of CFBDS0059 and ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 (hereafter ULAS0034), previously the coolest known brown dwarf, indicates that CFBDS0059 is ~50±15K cooler. We estimate a temperature of Teff ~ 620K and gravity of log g ~ 4.75. Evolutionary models translate these parameters into an age of 1-5 Gyr and a mass of 15-30 M_Jup. We estimate a photometric distance of ~13pc, which puts CFBDS0059 within easy reach of accurate parallax measurements. Its large proper motion suggests membership in the older population of the thin disk. The spectra of both CFBDS0059 and ULAS J0034 shows probable absorption by a wide ammonia band on the blue side of the H-band flux peak. If, as we expect, that feature deepens further for still lower effective temperatures, its appearance will become a natural breakpoint for the transition between the T spectral class and the new Y spectral type. CFBDS0059 and ULAS J0034 would then be the first Y0 dwarfs.

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CFBDS0005910

Position(2000): RA 00:59:10.903, Dec -01:14:01.13

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An international team of astronomers has discovered the coldest brown dwarf star ever observed. This finding, to be published in Astronomy & Astrophysics, is a new step toward filling the gap between stars and planets.
An international team  led by French and Canadian astronomers has just discovered the coldest brown dwarf ever observed. Their results will soon be published in Astronomy & Astrophysics. This new finding was made possible by the performance of telescopes worldwide: Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and Gemini North Telescope, both located in Hawaii, and the ESO/NTT located in Chile.
The brown dwarf is named CFBDS J005910.83-011401.3 (it will be called CFBDS0059 in the following). Its temperature is about 350°C and its mass about 15-30 times the mass of Jupiter, the largest planet of our solar system. Located about 40 light years from our solar system, it is an isolated object, meaning that it doesn't orbit another star.

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