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Post Info TOPIC: Wolfe Creek Crater


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Kandimalal
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The local Djaru (Jaru) Aboriginal people know it as Kandimalal. It was brought to the attention of science after being spotted during an aerial survey in 1947, investigated on the ground two months later, and reported in publication in 1949. The European name for the crater comes from a nearby creek, which was in turn named after Robert Wolfe (early reports misspell the name as Wolf Creek), a prospector and storekeeper during the gold rush that established the town of Halls Creek.
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RE: Wolfe Creek Crater
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A beautiful stream of moonlit clouds drift into the distance, above Kandimalal, Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater, Australia. As the moon sets, shadows move across the floor of the crater, as the sky darkens to reveal a sky full of stars. Kandimalal is the Aboriginal name of this very well preserved impact crater, which is located in the East Kimberley region of Western Australia. The crater is about 900 meters in diameter and estimated to be some 300,000 years old.
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Air Safari over Wolfe Creek Crater

Flying over this gigantic 'hole' formed by the impact of a meteorite more than 300,000 million years ago, gives you a chance to appreciate the magnitude of the strange phenomenon - the second largest meteor crater in the world - and to discover one of the lesser known areas of Western Australia.
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Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater, Western Australia shot at sunset on the 20th July, 2006 on our trip towards the Canning Stock Route. The crater is largely indiscernible from the surrounding countryside when at ground level but once you climb the rim and see the 850 metre crater stretched out in front of you, there's no doubting it's origins, namely a 50,000 tonne rock slamming into the earth at a velocity of 15 km per second. Not a place to be standing some 300,000 years ago.

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Tourism Western Australia is not so keen about promoting that other great Western Australian movie location, Wolfe Creek (in the Wolfe Creek Meteor Crater National Park, 1800 kilometres north-east of Perth), where the 2005 horror movie of almost the same name turned many potential campers off the outback for life.

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Wolfe Creek Crater
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Australias Aboriginal people had long known about the crater near Wolfe Creek by the time an aerial survey identified it in 1947. Almost circular, Wolfe Creek Crater (also known as Wolf Creek Crater) is considered the second largest crater in the world from which meteorite fragments have been collected. Because of its excellent preservation, the crater clearly shows the classic features that result from a large meteorite striking the Earth.
The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image of Wolfe Creek Crater on September 22, 2006.

Latitude: 191020S, Longitude: 1274744E

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