* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: OGLE-2006-BLG-109L


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: OGLE-2006-BLG-109L
Permalink  
 


Title: Prospects for the habitability of OGLE-2006-BLG-109L
Authors: Renu Malhotra, David A. Minton

The extrasolar system OGLE-2006-BLG-109L is the first multiple-planet system to be discovered by gravitational microlensing (Gaudi et al., 2008); the two large planets that have been detected have mass ratios, semimajor axis ratios, and equilibrium temperatures that are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn; the mass of the host star is only 0.5 M_sun, and the system is more compact than our own Solar system. We find that in the habitable zone of the host star, the two detected planets resonantly excite large orbital eccentricities on a putative earth-mass planet, driving such a planet out of the habitable zone. We show that an additional inner planet of ~>0.3M_earth at <~0.1 AU would suppress the eccentricity perturbation and greatly improve the prospects for habitability of the system. Thus, the planetary architecture of a potentially habitable OGLE-2006-BLG-109L planetary system -- with two "terrestrial" planets and two jovian planets -- could bear very close resemblance to our own Solar system.

Read more (32kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Astronomers have discovered a planetary system orbiting a distant star which looks much like our own.
They found two planets that were close matches for Jupiter and Saturn orbiting a star about half the size of our Sun.
Martin Dominik, from the St Andrews University, UK, said the finding suggested systems like our own could be much more common than we thought.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analogue with Gravitational Microlensing
Authors: B.S.Gaudi, D.P.Bennett, A.Udalski, A.Gould, G.W.Christie, D.Maoz, S.Dong, J.McCormick, M.K.Szymanski, P.J.Tristram, S.Nikolaev, B.Paczynski, M.Kubiak, G.Pietrzynski, I.Soszynski, O.Szewczyk, K.Ulaczyk, L.Wyrzykowski, D.L.DePoy, C.Han, S.Kaspi, C.-U.Lee, F.Mallia, T.Natusch, R.W.Pogge, B.-G.Park, F.Abe, I.A.Bond, C.S.Botzler, A.Fukui, J.B.Hearnshaw, Y.Itow, K.Kamiya, A.V.Korpela, P.M.Kilmartin, W.Lin, K.Masuda, Y.Matsubara, M.Motomura, Y.Muraki, S.Nakamura, T.Okumura, K.Ohnishi, N.J.Rattenbury, T.Sako, To.Saito, S.Sato, L.Skuljan, D.J.Sullivan, T.Sumi, W.L.Sweatman, P.C.M.Yock, M.D.Albrow, A.Allan, J.-P.Beaulieu, M.J.Burgdorf, K.H.Cook, C.Coutures, M.Dominik, S.Dieters, P.Fouque, J.Greenhill, K.Horne, I.Steele, Y.Tsapras, B.Chaboyer, A.Crocker, S.Frank, B.Macintosh (OGLE, MicroFUN, MOA, PLANET/RoboNET)
(Version v2)

Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogues remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogues of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of ~0.71 and ~0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of ~2.3 and ~4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass ~0.50 solar masses at a distance of ~1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogues may be common.

Read more (105kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

In a galaxy far, far away lies a mini version of our own solar system that could even have intelligent life.
The amazing discovery was made by a team using powerful telescopes.
They first spotted two gassy planets orbiting a Sun-like star and believe there could be a planet just like Earth.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analogue with Gravitational Microlensing
Authors: B.S.Gaudi, D.P.Bennett, A.Udalski, A.Gould, G.W.Christie, D.Maoz, S.Dong, J.McCormick, M.K.Szymanski, P.J.Tristram, S.Nikolaev, B.Paczynski, M.Kubiak, G.Pietrzynski, I.Soszynski, O.Szewczyk, K.Ulaczyk, L.Wyrzykowski, D.L.DePoy, C.Han, S.Kaspi, C.-U.Lee, F.Mallia, T.Natusch, R.W.Pogge, B.-G.Park, F.Abe, I.A.Bond, C.S.Botzler, A.Fukui, J.B.Hearnshaw, Y.Itow, K.Kamiya, A.V.Korpela, P.M.Kilmartin, W.Lin, K.Masuda, Y.Matsubara, M.Motomura, Y.Muraki, S.Nakamura, T.Okumura, K.Ohnishi, N.J.Rattenbury, T.Sako, To.Saito, S.Sato, L.Skuljan, D.J.Sullivan, T.Sumi, W.L.Sweatman, P.C.M.Yock, M.D.Albrow, A.Allan, J.-P.Beaulieu, M.J.Burgdorf, K.H.Cook, C.Coutures, M.Dominik, S.Dieters, P.Fouque, J.Greenhill, K.Horne, I.Steele, Y.Tsapras (OGLE, MicroFUN, MOA, PLANET/RoboNET), B.Chaboyer, A.Crocker, S.Frank, et al (0 additional authors not shown)

Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogues remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of ~0.71 and ~0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of ~2.3 and ~4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass ~0.50 solar masses at a distance of ~1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogues may be common.

Read more (102kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Gaudi and colleagues say the system resembles a scaled-down version of Jupiter and Saturn in terms of the ratios between the planets' masses and orbits. The heavier planet is 2.6 times as massive as the lighter one (Jupiter is 3.3 times Saturn's mass) and orbits at half its distance, as does Jupiter in relation to Saturn.
But in actual terms, the alien planets are a little less massive than their counterparts in our solar system, and their orbits are only about half as big, at 4.6 and 2.3 times the size of Earth's orbit, respectively.
The newly found planets are also colder than Jupiter and Saturn because their host star is relatively dim the larger one is about -191 Celsius, while the smaller one is a frigid -214 C, the astronomers say.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Astronomers say they have found a miniature version of our own solar system 5,000 light years across the galaxy the first planetary system that really looks like our own, with outer giant planets and room for smaller inner planets.
The discovery, they said, means that our solar system might be more typical of planetary systems across the universe than had been thought.

Read more

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard