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Title: Chandra Characterisation of X-ray Emission in the Young F-Star Binary System HD 113766
Author: C.M. Lisse, D.J. Christian, S.J. Wolk, H.M. Günther, C.H. Chen, C.A. Grady

Using Chandra we have obtained imaging X-ray spectroscopy of the 10 to 16 Myr old F-star binary HD 113766. We individually resolve the binary components for the first time in the X-ray and find a total 0.3 to 2.0 keV luminosity of 2.2e29 erg/sec, consistent with previous RASS estimates. We find emission from the easternmost, infrared-bright, dusty member HD 113766A to be only 10% that of the western, infrared-faint member HD 113766B. There is no evidence for a 3rd late-type stellar or sub-stellar member of HD113766 with Lx > 6e25 erg s-1 within 2 arcmin of the binary pair. The ratio of the two stars Xray luminosity is consistent with their assignments as F2V and F6V by Pecaut et al. (2012). The emission is soft for both stars, kTApec = 0.30 to 0.50 keV, suggesting X-rays produced by stellar rotation and/or convection in young dynamos, but not accretion or outflow shocks which we rule out. A possible 2.8 +/- 0.15 (2{\sigma}) hr modulation in the HD 113766B X-ray emission is seen, but at very low confidence and of unknown provenance. Stellar wind drag models corresponding to Lx = 2e29 erg s-1 argue for a 1 mm dust particle lifetime around HD 113766B of only 90,0000 years, suggesting that dust around HD 113766B is quickly removed, whereas dust around HD 113766A can survive for > 1.5e6 yrs. At 1e28 to 1e29 erg s-1 luminosity, astrobiologically important effects, like dust warming and X-ray photolytic organic synthesis, are likely for any circumstellar material in the HD 113766 systems.

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HD 113766 A
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Title: The twofold debris disk around HD 113766 A - Warm and cold dust as seen with VLTI/Midi and Herschel/Pacs
Authors: Johan Olofsson, Thomas Henning, Markus Nielbock, Jean-Charles Augereau, Attila Juhasz, Isa Oliveira, Olivier Absil, Akemi Tamanai

Warm debris disks are a sub-sample of the large population of debris disks, and display excess emission in the mid-IR. Around solar-type stars, very few objects show emission features in mid-IR spectroscopic observations, that are attributed to small, warm silicate dust grains. The origin of this warm dust can possibly be explained either by a collision between several bodies or by transport from an outer belt. We present and analyse new far-IR Herschel/Pacs observations, supplemented by ground-based data in the mid-IR (VLTI/Midi and VLT/Visir), for one of these rare systems: the 10-16 Myr old debris disk around HD 113766 A. We improve an existing model to account for these new observations, and better constrain the spatial distribution of the dust and its composition. We underline the limitations of SED modelling and the need for spatially resolved observations. We find that the system is best described by an inner disk located within the first AU, well constrained by the Midi data, and an outer disk located between 9-13 AU. In the inner dust belt, our previous finding of Fe-rich crystalline olivine grains still holds. We do not observe time variability of the emission features over at least a 8 years time span, in a environment subjected to strong radiation pressure. The time stability of the emission features indicates that µm-sized dust grains are constantly replenished from the same reservoir, with a possible depletion of sub-µ-m-sized grains. We suggest that the emission features may arise from multi-composition aggregates. We discuss possible scenarios concerning the origin of the warm dust. The compactness of the innermost regions as probed by Midi, as well as the dust composition, suggest that we are witnessing the outcomes of (at least) one collision between partially differentiated bodies, in an environment possibly rendered unstable by terrestrial planetary formation.

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An Earth-like planet is likely forming 424 light-years away in a star system called HD 113766, say astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

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HD 113766, an F3 binary star (F3/F5, 1.2 separation)

RA: 13: 6:35.84 Dec: -46: 2: 2.00

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Title: Circumstellar Dust Created by Terrestrial Planet Formation in HD 113766
Authors: C. M. Lisse, C. H. Chen, M. C. Wyatt, and A. Morlok

We present an analysis of the gas-poor circumstellar material in the HD 113766 binary system (F3/F5, ~16Myr), recently observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. For our study we have used the infrared mineralogical model derived from observations of the Deep Impact experiment. We find the dust dominated by warm, fine (~1 um) particles, abundant in Mg-rich olivine, crystalline pyroxenes, amorphous silicates, Fe-rich sulfides, amorphous carbon, and colder water-ice. The warm dust material mix is akin to an inner main belt asteroid of S-type composition. The ~440 K effective temperature of the warm dust implies that the bulk of the observed material is in a narrow belt ~1.8 AU from the 4.4 Lsolar central source, in the terrestrial planet-forming region and habitable zone of the system (equivalent to 0.9 AU in the solar system). The icy dust lies in 2 belts, located at 4-9 AU and at 3080 AU. The lower bound of warm dust mass in 0.1 - 20 m, dn/da ~ a^-3.5 particles is very large, at least 3 x 10^20 kg, equivalent to a 320 km radius asteroid of 2.5 g cm^-3 density. Assuming 10m largest particles present, the lower bound of warm dust mass is at least 0.5 Mars masses The dust around HD 113766A originates from catastrophic disruption of terrestrial planet embryo(s) and subsequent grinding of the fragments, or from collisions in a young, extremely dense asteroid belt undergoing aggregation. The persistence of the strong IR excess over the last two decades argues for a mechanism to provide replenishment of the circumstellar material on yearly timescales.

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An Earth-like planet is likely forming 424 light-years away in a star system called HD 113766, say astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
Scientists have discovered a huge belt of warm dust enough to build a Mars-size planet or larger swirling around a distant star that is just slightly more massive than our sun. The dust belt, which they suspect is clumping together into planets, is located in the middle of the system's terrestrial habitable zone. This is the region around a star where liquid water could exist on any rocky planets that might form. Earth is located in the middle of our sun's terrestrial habitable zone.

At approximately 10 million years old, the star is also at just the right age for forming rocky planets.

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