* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Herbig-Haro 46 - 47


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Herbig-Haro 46 - 47
Permalink  
 


Spitzer and ALMA Reveal a Star's Bubbly Birth

Combined observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the newly completed Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile have revealed the throes of stellar birth as never before in the well-studied object known as HH 46/47.
Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: ALMA Observations of the HH 46/47 Molecular Outflow
Authors: Hector G. Arce, Diego Mardones, Stuartt Corder, Guido Garay, Alberto Noriega-Crespo, Alejandro C. Raga, Sylvie Cabrit

The morphology, kinematics and entrainment mechanism of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow were studied using new ALMA Cycle 0 observations. Results show that the blue and red lobes are strikingly different. We argue that these differences are partly due to contrasting ambient densities that result in different wind components having a distinct effect on the entrained gas in each lobe. A 29-point mosaic, covering the two lobes at an angular resolution of about 3", detected outflow emission at much higher velocities than previous observations, resulting in significantly higher estimates of the outflow momentum and kinetic energy than previous studies of this source, using the CO(1-0) line. The morphology and the kinematics of the gas in the blue lobe are consistent with models of outflow entrainment by a wide-angle wind, and a simple model may describe the observed structures in the position-velocity diagram and the integrated intensity map. The red lobe exhibits a more complex structure, and there is evidence that this lobe is entrained by a wide-angle wind and a collimated episodic wind. Three major clumps along the outflow axis show velocity distribution consistent with prompt entrainment by different bow shocks formed by periodic mass ejection episodes which take place every few hundred years. Position-velocity cuts perpendicular to the outflow cavity show gradients where the velocity increases towards the outflow axis, inconsistent with outflow rotation. Additionally, we find evidence for the existence of a small outflow driven by a binary companion.

Read more (3689kb, PDF)



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Herbig-Haro object HH 47
Permalink  
 


Hubble: Stellar Jet HH 47


Credit: NASA, ESA, & P. Haritgan (Rice U.)

This video shows the evolution over time of Herbig-Haro object HH 47, a jet expelled from a newborn star in the southern constellation of Vela. The video was made by stitching together observations of HH 47 made in 1994, 1999 and 2008.

Read more 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Herbig-Haro 46 - 47
Permalink  
 


Des chercheurs du réseau européen JETSET viennent d'étudier les jets produits par des étoiles jeunes éjectant de la matière, les objets Herbig Haro. Pour cette étude ils ont reproduit ces jets, d'une part par expérience en laboratoire, d'autre part par simulation numérique. Cette double approche expérimentale et virtuelle permet ainsi de démontrer que le vent interstellaire joue un rôle fondamental en interagissant avec le jet, créant ainsi ces nodules et ces ruptures de structure.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

A new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a baby star 1,140 light-years away from Earth blowing two massive "bubbles." But instead of bubble gum, this youngster, called HH 46/47, is using powerful jets of gas to make bubbles in outer space.
The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the centre of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are from starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

hh4547
Expand (210kb, 1024 x 768)
Expand (1.3mb, 2000 x 1600)
Baby Star HH 46/47
NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Velusamy (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

Position (J2000): RA: 08h25m43.90s Dec: -51d00m36.00s

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Highly Collimated Jets and Wide-Angle Outflows in HH46/47: New Evidence from Spitzer IR Images
Authors: T. Velusamy, W. D. Langer, K. A. Marsh

We present new details of the structure and morphology of the jets and outflows in HH46/47 as seen in Spitzer infrared images from IRAC and MIPS, reprocessed using the "HiRes" deconvolution technique. HiRes improves the visualisation of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to sub-arcsec levels in IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources. In addition to sharper views of previously reported bow shocks, we have detected: (i) the sharply-delineated cavity walls of the wide-angle biconical outflow, seen in scattered light on both sides of the protostar, (ii) several very narrow jet features at distances 400 AU to 0.1 pc from the star, and, (iii) compact emissions at MIPS 24 micron coincident with the jet heads, tracing the hottest atomic/ionic gas in the bow shocks.

Read more (784kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: HH47
Permalink  
 



These massive streams of plasma spew from the poles of newborn stars, playing a critical, yet poorly understood role in star formation.


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Astronomers track massive shockwaves in plasma escaping newborn star

Like traffic on a freeway, plasma spewing from the poles of newborn stars moves in clumps that travel at different speeds. When fast-moving particles run into slower material on these cosmic freeways, the resulting "traffic jams" create massive shock waves that travel trillions of miles.



Expand (566kb, 950 x 750)

Thanks to highly resolved images from the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers have created the first moving pictures of one of these cosmic freeways, which are known as stellar jets. The movies allow scientists to trace these stellar jet shock waves for the first time, gleaning important clues about a critical, yet poorly understood process of starbirth. The results appeared in the November issue of Astronomical Journal.

"When it comes to actually showing exactly what's going on, there's just nothing like a movie. You can look at a still image and make up all kinds of stories, but they all go out the window when you see a movie" - Co-author Patrick Hartigan, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Rice University.



Hartigan and researchers from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIAO) in Chile, Arizona State University (ASU), the University of Hawaii and the University of Colorado at Boulder, made the movies using images taken in 1994 and 1999 of a newly formed star called HH 47 in the constellation Vela. Because Hubble flies above the Earth's atmosphere, it can take much clearer images than Earth-based telescopes. As a result, Hartigan and his co-researchers were able to resolve objects in the Hubble images that were 20 times smaller than objects resolved in similar images taken on Earth. This extra resolution, and the five-year gap between Hubble surveys of HH 47, allowed them to make moving pictures of the stellar jet shock waves moving away from the new star.

"Imagine taking a photo at a football game that shows the quarterback throwing the ball at the start of a play. There is no way to know what happened in the play without a second photograph at the end of the play that shows a touchdown, incomplete pass, interception, or whatever occurs. If you take a series of photos, with enough resolution to make out the ball, you could determine whether someone ran with the ball or caught a pass, and you could determine the relative position of all of the players to one another at any time during the play. Like the time-lapse images of the game, our movies give us the ability to track the movement of individual features within the stellar jet, both relative to stationary objects and relative to other objects that are moving within the jet at a different speed" - Patrick Hartigan.

New stars form out of giant clouds of gas and dust. Within these clouds, strong gravitational forces pull material together into a tight ball surrounded by a large spinning disk. The new star forms out of the ball, and any planets that might form do so in the disk. Through processes not well-understood, much of the disk material gradually spirals into the star, and the resulting energy from this process drives stellar jets of plasma that erupt from the star at perpendicular angles to the spinning accretion disk. The material thrown away from the star in the jets acts as a brake on disk, slowing its rotation and allowing more material to fall into the growing star. Scientists know stellar jets play an integral role in star formation, but they have yet to determine the specifics of their role, or how it is carried out.

Source

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard