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Post Info TOPIC: Standing Stones


L

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RE: Standing Stones
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Nine megaliths in a remote part of Dartmoor, England, share features in common with Stonehenge, and may shed light on the meaning behind these prehistoric stone monuments, according to a report in the latest issue of British Archaeology.
The Dartmoor megaliths, which were recently carbon-dated to around 3500 B.C., could predate Stonehenge, but both sites feature large standing stones that are aligned to mark the rising of the midsummer sun and the setting of the midwinter sun. Yet another Dartmoor stone monument, called Drizzlecombe, shares the same orientation.

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Kilmartin Glen, in Argyll, has one of the most important concentrations of Neolithic and Bronze Age remains in Europe. The glen contains at least 350 ancient monuments, many of them prehistoric, including burial cairns, rock carvings and standing stones. But archaeologists have identified a period of almost 1,000 years in which no monuments were erected and the population there 'diminished'. They claim this period is marked by the start of a colder, wetter climate.

"The earliest activity dates back to hunter-gatherers around 4,500 BCE, who left behind nothing more than a few pits, charcoal and some flint. It was a sacred landscape from at least as early as 3,700 BCE until as late as 1,100 BCE. It was a place for ceremony, for burying people and observing the movements of the sun and the moon. We are not too certain what happened between 1,100 BCE and around 200 BCE. A hoard of swords has been found and a few artefacts buried as gifts to the gods in the late Bronze Age between 1,000 and 750 BCE. But there are very few structures and no settlements. Certainly, in some parts it seems to have become colder and wetter after about 1,200 BCE, and the people may have moved away" - Dr Alison Sheridan, an archaeologist and head of early prehistory at the National Museum of Scotland, who has studied Kilmartin Glen for more than 20 years.

Kilmartin Glen was home to self-sufficient and successful communities with links around the country and even overseas. Historic monuments include standing stones, a henge, a linear cemetery comprising five burial cairns and numerous cists, or stone coffins, which contained remains of adults and children as young as four. Neal Ascherson, visiting Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, said climate change brought an end to "this strange, idyllic period of late Neolithic and Bronze Age in this area".

"The weather, which was dryer and finer than it is now, seems to have come to an end around 1,000 BCE, when it began to change and the whole ecology began to alter. At the same time, culture changed. The capacity or wish to build these monuments and indeed to honour them or take account of them, died away. And in the Iron Age nobody took much account of these monuments and certainly nobody tried to build anything of the kind again. Instead, you get a quite different culture in which you get tiny fortified settlements and you feel everything is colder and more hostile. The population diminished heavily, but whoever was left seemed to fear everyone else" - Neal Ascherson.

"When the first people moved in to this landscape it would have been a landscape of plenty. It was a really rich place for the hunter-gatherer people to find enough resources to live" - Sharon Webb, the curator of the Kilmartin Museum.

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batu kuya
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Two weeks after a six-ton ancient monument was taken illegally from Haur Bentes Forest Preserve, villagers living in the adjacent kampung were still filled with anxiety.
Locals call it batu kuya, turtle rock, or batu kuda, horse rock because of its shape. It stands 4 meters high with a diameter of 3 meters. Regency officials said it could be a monument dating from the fourth-century Sundanese kingdom called Tarumanagara.

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Lake Turgoyak
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Isle of Vera
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A new museum complex to study and preserve ancient megaliths (ceremonial structures of massive stones) will be soon created in the Isle of Vera, Lake Turgoyak of the Chelyabinsk region.

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RE: Standing Stones
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Haliburton Forest rock Structure
While divers were conducting a unique submarine project in MacDonald Lake at the Haliburton Forest and Wild Life Reserve, they encountered an ancient stone structure revealing proof of life from Central Ontario ancestors.
The history of Eastern Canada is generally viewed in two stages: 1st - recent history, measured in decades and centuries, involving the early, white settlers and 2nd - the early history, measured in many centuries and millennia, represented by petroglyphs, stone mounds and arrow heads that takes us several hundred, sometimes a thousand or two years back into North America's native past.

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Midshiels Standing Stone
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Local historian Alan Brydon has been instrumental in protecting a site of significant archaeological importance which dates back thousands of years. The ancient site at Midshiels (about 4km SW from Hawick, Scotland) comprises a standing stone that is reportedly 4,000 years old and an ancient burial mound, were under threat due to the renewal of power lines and poles in the area.
But Alan's quick thinking has ensured the sight remains undisturbed.

"Knowing the archaeological importance of the area, I had been watching the progress as poles were being erected and since the new lines and poles were running parallel to the old ones, it appeared that they would comfortably miss the enclosure. However, on Thursday afternoon, just before dusk, I noticed that a marker post had been planted in the middle of the enclosure. Alarm bells were ringing in my head, it was the next pylon to be installed and fortunately they had stopped work that day just before that point. But I realised that the next pole would be the first to be sunk the following morning" - Alan Brydon.

Alan then spent a frantic night making phone calls to the Royal Commission, Historic Scotland, Councillor Stuart Marshall, Provost Zandra Elliot and several members of the Archaeological Society. Fortunately, the next morning, Alan managed to meet with the two staff members from the contractor before they started work.

"I made contact with Rory McDonald, Scottish Borders Council's archaeological officer, and he immediately made his way over to Midshiels. What followed was a model for diplomacy and common sense. Both Mr McDonald and Charlie Dodds from ScottishPower were fully supportive and did their utmost to find a solution which was eventually reached, resulting in a repositioning of the overhead power lines. Who knows what is underneath the site but it just seemed criminal to be driving poles into it. Now it will be preserved" - Alan Brydon.

Source: Hawick News

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