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TOPIC: Mount Nyiragongo


L

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RE: Mount Nyiragongo
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When? This is the question that has brought two of the world's leading volcano scientists to the center of Africa; it's the question that haunts a team of Congolese seismologists; it's the question that may determine the fate of close to one million people. When will Nyiragongo erupt?
Nyiragongo is a two-mile-high volcano towering over the eastern edge of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) - one of the most active volcanoes on the planet and also one of the least studied.

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Congo receives help from space after volcano eruption

On 2 January, Mount Nyamulagira in the Democratic Republic of Congo erupted, spewing lava from its southern flank and raising concerns that the 100 000 people in the town of Sake could be under threat.
Fears were also triggered in Goma as rumours circulated that an eruption was imminent at the nearby Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the city in 2002.

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Volcanic ash in the Democratic Republic of Congo is creating a health hazard for people and animals. Mount Nyamulagira is one of Africa's most active volcanoes, and continues to erupt for a fourth day.
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Mount Nyamulagira
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Lava from a volcano in a sparsely populated area of the Democratic Republic of Congo is threatening rare chimpanzees.
Lava flowing from a volcanic eruption in eastern DR Congo was gathering pace and set to destroy up to 10 hectares of forest in Virunga National Park by late Sunday.
The Goma Volcanological Observatory, which has been monitoring the eruption of nearby Mount Nyamulagira (2.964 m) early Saturday, said the pace of destruction would increase as it hit steeper ground.

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Lake Kivu
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More than two million people living on the banks of Lake Kivu in central Africa are at risk of being asphyxiated by gases building up beneath its surface, scientists have warned.
It is estimated that the lake, which straddles the borders of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda, now contains 300 cubic kilometres of carbon dioxide and 60 cubic kilometres of methane that have bubbled into the Kivu from volcanic vents. The gases are trapped in layers 80 metres below the lake's surface by the intense water pressures there. However, researchers have warned that geological or volcanic events could disturb these waters and release the gases.

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L

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RE: Mount Nyiragongo
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Scientists found evidence of intense volcanic activity - including tremors, pools of lava and plumes of smoke - at two volcanoes near a major city in eastern Congo, and said some residents had fled for fear of an eruption.

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Scientists in the Democratic Republic of Congo have recorded significant increased volcanic activity around Goma in the east of the country.
Half of the city was destroyed in 2002 after the nearest of two volcanoes, Mount Nyiragongo, erupted.

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L

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Nyiragongo volcano
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Recent volcanic activity in the Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira peaks in North Kivu Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has triggered fears that the 600,000 people in Goma could be under threat, according to specialists.
Dieudonne Wafula, head of Gomas Volcanological Observatory, told IRIN on 7 May that the two volcanoes had shown early warnings of eruption.

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Lake Kivu
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There have also been volcanic incidents at Lake Kivu in the past. On January 17, 2002, a stream of lava from Mt. Nyiragongo, a volcano approximately 11 miles from the lake, burned its way through the lakeside city of Goma, forcing between 300,000 and 400,000 people to flee and destroying several nearby areas. When the lava hit the water, it created a huge cloud of steam, and some scientists worried that a deadly overturn would result. Luckily, the lava sank only about 300 feet into the lake - not deep enough to release a toxic cloud of CO2 and methane.
Had the molten rock sank to a depth of 1,000 feet, it might have unleashed a catastrophe like the one that hit Lake Nyos in Cameroon in 1986. In the course of just a few hours, Lake Nyos released enough CO2 to kill 1,700 people as far as 15 miles from the lake, suffocating them in a cloud of dense carbon dioxide.

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