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Scandinavian trees
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Scandinavian trees 'survived last Ice Age'
 
Some Scandinavian trees survived the last Ice Age, challenging a widely held notion that they were killed off by the huge ice sheet that covered the region.
Modern trees in Scandinavia were thought to descend from species that migrated north when the ice melted 9,000 years ago.
But research suggests some conifers survived on mountain peaks that protruded from the enormous ice sheet, on islands and in coastal areas.

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RE: Ancient Forests
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Sturdy Scandinavian conifers survived Ice Age

Until now, it was presumed that the last glacial period denuded the Scandinavian landscape of trees until a gradual return of milder weather began and melted away the ice cover some 9000 years ago. That perspective is now disproved by research headed by Professor Eske Willerslev from the Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Laura Parducci from the University of Uppsala, Sweden, and Inger Greve Alsos from Tromsų University Museum, Norway. Their research teams show that some Scandinavian conifers survived the inhospitable ice age climate likely for several thousands of years. The result is to be published in the esteemed scientific journal, Science.
The story of Scandinavian forests needs revamping when it comes to the history of conifers, spruce and pine in particular. Until now, researchers believed that contemporary coniferous forests in Scandinavia were the products of species migration from the areas of southern and eastern Europe that were ice-free during the last ice age. Indeed, the last glacial period saw Scandinavia covered by a formidable ice sheet.

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Early forests tamed wild rivers

The evolution and spread of trees stabilised river banks and changed landscapes around the world forever, geologists say.
Before the switch, broad, shallow, braided river channels could spread and migrate endlessly from side to side.
Only when tree-like plants with deep roots took hold some 330 million years ago did river banks finally come under control, say researchers.

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Scientists have drawn up a 'Red List' of 44 species of Central Asian fruit trees that could soon disappear unless drastic action is taken.
Around 90 per cent of the fruit and nut forests in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan have been destroyed over the past 50 years.

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Unearthing ancient forests can take some detective work, says Jack Watkins.
It's likely that most of us, wherever we live, have an ancient wood nearby. What's more, anyone can try their hand at a bit of light detective work as these woods have several features that can be used to broadly establish their age. The easiest place to start, explains Fran Hitchinson, conservation policy officer of the Woodland Trust, is by looking at a map.

"Old ones are not always reliable, and they often omitted features, but if your wood is not on a map, it's obviously a bad sign. Irregular shapes are another vital clue. If you created a new wood today, you'd make it square, the easiest shape to fence" - Fran Hitchinson.

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Malaysia is zooming in on forests with a satellite in order to fight illegal logging which its government says is harming the major timber exporting country, a report said Sunday.
Darus Ahmad, deputy director-general with the Malaysian Remote Sensing Agency, said the "eye in the sky" programme was put in place in October.

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Action Alert: Stop WWF's Betrayal of the Earth's Last Ancient Forests
WWF is the world's largest ancient forest logging apologist; actively promoting questionable "certified, sustainable" logging in Guyana, Russia and elsewhere -- and may be the World's greatest threat facing endangered ancient forests
For many years the international conservation group WWF has supported Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification that first-time logging of ancient primary and old-growth forests is "sustainable". Millions of hectares of intact, large rainforest ecosystems have been and are being heavily industrially logged for the first time with WWF and FSC's stamp of approval. Ecological Internet (EI) recently reported upon Samling of Malaysia's activities in Guyana under the name of Barama (1.3 million ha/3.2 million acres), which received significant international bank financing based upon assurances provided by WWF and an FSC certificate of good forest management.
Sadly, WWF's partnering with this particular rainforest destroyer in Guyana is not at all unique. Similar large-scale, often illegal and highly socially and environmentally destructive logging of ancient forests in the Congo basin countries, Russia, and Indonesia continue with the blessing of WWF and FSC as their official policy. WWF's greenwashing, and propagation and subsidizing of the myth of "sustainable ancient forest logging", may be the greatest threat to the world's remaining ancient forests.

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