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Kick'em Jenny volcano
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Reported increase in activity at "Kick-Em-Jenny" submarine volcano

A reported increase in activities at "Kick-Em-Jenny"...the region's only submarine volcano located between Grenada and the Grenadine island of Carriacou.
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Water vessels on alert as Kick 'em Jenny volcano rumbles to life off Grenada

An active underwater volcano is rumbling beneath the Caribbean Sea. And scientists say an eruption could sink water vessels and shoot up hot rocks into the air.
The volcano, Kick 'em Jenny, sits off the northern coast of Grenada. Officials raised its threat level Thursday to orange, which means it could erupt with less than 24-hour notice.

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Kick 'Em Jenny Volcano Rumbling Near Grenada, Expected To Erupt Within 24 Hours

Kick 'em Jenny, an undersea volcano near the north coast of Grenada, was rumbling Thursday, prompting the regional disaster authorities to be on alert. The officials, however, said the volcano posed no tsunami threat to the Caribbean country or other neighbouring islands of the Lesser Antilles
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Beebe Vent Field
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Deepest undersea vents discovered by UK team

UK scientists exploring the ocean floor in the Caribbean have discovered an "astounding" set of hydrothermal vents, the deepest anywhere in the world.
Deploying a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) in the Cayman Trough, they stumbled across a previously-unknown site nearly 5000m below the surface.

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Mid-Cayman Rise
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Deep-sea Vents Yield New Species

Call it "midnight at the OASES." Neither permanent darkness nor extreme pressure and heat cause problems for a host of new deep-sea species found in January by an international research expedition called "OASES 2012."
The expedition, led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution geochemist Chris German, explored hydrothermal vents on the seafloor in the Caribbean, which spew out super-heated chemical-rich fluids that provide oases for life forms in the dark, cold depths. The researchers returned with specimens and a new appreciation for the ability of life forms to adapt to some of the harshest conditions on Earth.
The researchers first found evidence of the vents on a cruise in 2009. They returned to the area this year aboard the research vessel Atlantis with the remotely operated vehicle Jason and specialised sampling equipment to study the chemistry, geology, and biology of the vents at the Mid-Cayman Rise.

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RE: Kick‘em Jenny
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Cayman vents are world's hottest

The world's deepest known volcanic vents are also the hottest, a UK-led expedition has indicated.
The seafloor vents are located 5km below the surface of the Caribbean, in the Cayman Trough.
The researchers say the structures are shooting jets of mineral-rich water more than a kilometre into the ocean above.
The vents' features suggest the water is warmer than 450C - hot enough to melt lead.

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Cayman Trough
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A state-of-the-art British submarine will be spending most of the next two months prowling the entire length of the Cayman Trough, thought by scientists to be the deepest volcanic ridge in the world.
The specially designed robot sub is only a mere 5.5 meters long, but can dive to a metal-crushing depth of 6,000 meters, half the length of Seven Mile Beach. Roughly the size of the mini-buses that ply the West Bay Road, the Autosub 6000 is equipped with sonar as well as special temperature, depth and chemical sensors.

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Scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton are set to explore the world's deepest undersea volcanoes and find out what lives in a 'lost world' five kilometres beneath the Caribbean.
The team of researchers led by Dr Jon Copley, from the University of Southamptons School of Ocean and Earth Science, has been awarded £462,000 by the Natural Environment Research Council to explore the Cayman Trough, which lies between Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. This rift in the Caribbean seafloor plunges to a depth of more than 5,000 metres below sea level. It contains the world's deepest chain of undersea volcanoes, which have yet to be explored.


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This week, researchers will begin direct monitoring of the rumblings of a submarine volcano in the south-eastern Caribbean Sea. On May 6, a team of scientists led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) installed a new underwater earthquake monitoring system on top of Kickem Jenny, a volcano just off of the north coast of the island nation of Grenada. The new mooring- and seismic monitoring technology will significantly improve the ability of natural hazard managers to notify and protect the islands residents from volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.
Part of a project to develop new technology for earthquake monitoring in coastal areas, the Real Time Offshore Seismic Station (RTOSS) uses an ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) deployed directly on top of the volcano250 meters beneath the sea surfaceto collect real-time data from Kickem Jenny. RTOSS employs a special mooring design that allows seismic data to be transmitted by high-frequency radio to a land-based observatory in the village of Sauteurs. The data will reach the shore within milliseconds of being collected, which will significantly improve the ability of researchers to monitor seismic activity as it happens, a basic requirement for reducing hazards from volcanic gas and rock bursts and from tsunami-generating seafloor avalanches.

This is the first time that radio telemetry has been used to transmit data from an underwater seismic monitoring station. By putting a seismometer right on the volcano, we will significantly improve our ability to detect precursory activity before an eruption takes place - Rob Reves-Sohn, an associate scientist in the WHOI Department of Geology and Geophysics and an RTOSS project leader.

Scientists will be able to observe the inhaling and exhaling of the volcano as it draws in and expels seawater, magma, and superheated fluids.
The WHOI research team is coordinating with the National Disaster Management Agency in Grenada and the Seismic Unit of the University of the West Indies so that the data is incorporated into the existing regional monitoring network.
A key element of RTOSS, developed by engineers at WHOI, is the flexible, stretchy hose that connects the seafloor anchor and instruments to the buoy on the sea surface. This hose is designed to compensate for the movement of waves, tides, and currents (which are notoriously rough around Kickem Jenny), and stretches to more than two times its original length without snapping. Electrical conductors are spiralled through the wall of the hose so that the wires straighten out, rather than break, when the hose stretches. A surface buoy on the end of the mooring uses solar panels to power the radio transmitters that send the data approximately seven kilometres to a shore station near the coast.
The mooring system was developed by engineers Keith von der Heydt and Dan Frye of the WHOI Instrument Systems Development Laboratory, along with geologist Uri ten Brink of the U.S. Geological Survey. Other team members include Spahr Webb of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who designed the seismometer, and Richard Robertson at the Seismic Research Unit of the University of the West Indies, who manages the regional monitoring network.
Kick'em Jenny provides scientists with a unique natural laboratory to study the activity at a shallow submarine volcano that will one day emerge from the ocean as a new volcanic island. It is the only live submarine volcano in the West Indies, and it has erupted at least twelve times since 1939. The last major eruption occurred in 2001.

Source: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Kickem Jenny
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Latitude: 12.296535°N Longitude: 61.635054°W

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