* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Standing Stones of Stenness


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Standing Stones of Stenness
Permalink  
 


Standing Stones of Stenness

The Standing Stones of Stenness (HY311125) were originally a circle of 12 stones with a diameter of 30m and now comprise of 4 uprights, the tallest of which is over 5m high. The circle was surrounded by a rock-cut ditch 2m deep, 7m wide and 44m in diameter which has become filled-in over the years. Excavation has revealed a square setting of stones and bedding holes for further uprights, either stone or wooden.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

In August 1814, the novelist Sir Walter Scott visited the Standing Stones o' Stenness and rather naively proclaimed that the central stone slab was:

"probably once the altar on which human sacrifices were made"

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Orion’s belt
Permalink  
 


If there is one constellation that dominates an Orkney winter, it must surely be Orion.
Even to those not remotely interested in astronomy, this pattern of stars is one of the most striking and recognisable in night sky. Four bright stars form an hourglass shape around Orion’s "belt" - a band of three stars forming a straight (or almost straight) line.

The 5,500-year-old Thornborough Henges, in North Yorkshire, had been declared to be the world’s first monument aligned to Orion.

"Thornborough was a sacred landscape, a place of religious worship, and we should try to interpret these astronomical orientations within that context. This astronomical association was emphasised by the banks of the henges being coated in brilliant white gypsum. Neolithic people surely felt they were at the centre of the very cosmos as they worshipped the heavens above" - Dr Jan Harding, senior lecturer at Newcastle University.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Standing Stones of Stenness
Permalink  
 


For those seeking the romantic gesture to end all romantic gestures, there's still time (a minimum 15 days' notice is needed) to arrange Valentine's Day nuptials on the ancient site that once held the world's biggest engagement ring. Orkney's Standing Stones of Stenness are widely believed to be part of a 5,000-year-old fertility site and associated rituals included handfasting ceremonies centred on a huge monolith with a hole in the middle. The prehistoric Stone of Odin is no longer there but in recent years "romancing the stone" on the site has become very popular with couples of all religious persuasions. Some bring a minister, some a Wiccan priest, some just do their own thing.

Read more

Latitude: 58.993977N  Longitude: 3.207749W

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard