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The Lyrid Meteors, or "Lyrids," are associated with Comet Thatcher first discovered in 1861. As this comet revolves around the Sun every 415 years, it gives off gases and dust particles due to the heat of the Sun. While the gases eventually are dispersed throughout space, the dust particles remain as a trail of debris in the path of the comet long after the comet has gone.
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The Lyrids meteor shower starts April 16th and will be most active after midnight to dawn on Wednesday April 22, 2009.
No matter where you are globally, the majority of Lyrids meteors are likely to soar across the sky in the dark hour before dawn.

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Sky watchers are in for a treat when the Lyrids meteor shower, the oldest known meteor shower, becomes visible on April 22, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said Wednesday.
Dario dela Cruz, chief of PAGASA's astronomical observation unit, said Lyrids will present up to 15 showers (or streaks) an hour in the eastern sky between midnight of April 22 and dawn of April 23.

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Besides the spectacular Quadrantids Meteor Shower that occurred in the first week of 2009, meteor shower activity for the first three months of the year is usually uneventful. April kicks off the second quarter of the year and also the start of better meteor shower viewing activity. The Lyrids meteor shower is the oldest documented meteor shower known to astronomers.

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Astronomers at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) remind the public of the annual Lyrid Meteor Shower in April. The Lyrids are predicted to reach a peak of about 20 meteors per hour at midnight EDT the night of Monday-Tuesday, April 21-22.

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The Lyrids meteor shower may not be as visible to stargazers when it passes over the earth on April 22, which is also Earth Day.
A bulletin from the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said on Sunday a waning moon on the fourth week of the month would make it difficult for observers to fully enjoy the annual sky spectacle.

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See flashing lights in the sky Friday night?
You might see more.
There were numerous reports of a meteorite near the Air Force Academy around 11 p.m.

"It kept lasting and lasting and lasting. All of a sudden there was a big green ball and it changed to a red colour and looked fiery. It seemed to shoot off some kinds of sparks and turned bright white. The sky lit up and then it went right into the mountains. It was frightening but at the same time amazing" - Jody Wolkensdorfer of northern Colorado Springs, who was driving in the area.

No need to panic.

"It was a meteor breaking up in the atmosphere" - Alan Gorski, Colorado Springs Astronomical Society spokesman.

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Lyrid meteor shower
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The sky will be dark and moonless for at least three hours before the first light of dawn on Sunday morning, when the annual Lyrid meteor shower is due to reach its peak.
The shower remains above one-half of its peak strength for about a day or two, centred on the showers maximum.

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