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Canon develops 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor for video capture

Canon Inc. announced today that the company has successfully developed a high-sensitivity 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor exclusively for video recording. Delivering high-sensitivity, low-noise imaging performance, the new Canon 35 mm CMOS sensor enables the capture of Full HD video even in exceptionally low-light environments.
The newly developed CMOS sensor features pixels measuring 19 microns square in size, which is more than 7.5-times the surface area of the pixels on the CMOS sensor incorporated in Canon's top-of-the-line EOS-1D X and other digital SLR cameras. In addition, the sensor's pixels and readout circuitry employ new technologies that reduce noise, which tends to increase as pixel size increases. Thanks to these technologies, the sensor facilitates the shooting of clearly visible video images even in dimly lit environments with as little as 0.03 lux of illumination, or approximately the brightness of a crescent moon - a level of brightness in which it is difficult for the naked eye to perceive objects. When recording video of astral bodies, while an electron-multiplying CCD, which realises approximately the same level of perception as the naked eye, can capture magnitude-6 stars, Canon's newly developed CMOS sensor is capable of recording faint stars with a magnitude of 8.5 and above.
 
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  New device brings CMOS chips up to speed

CMOS image sensors are cheap to produce and also superior in terms of power consumption and handling. In applications where only minimal light is available, however - such as astronomy - these semiconductor chips are reaching their limits. This is because large pixels arranged in a matrix do not allow for fast read-out speeds. Researchers at Fraunhofer IMS have now developed an optoelectronic device that speeds up this process.
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UV-transparent coating for image sensors

Image sensors as used in cell phones are partially colour-blind. This is because of their coating, which prevents UV light from passing through. CMOS chips have as a result not been suitable for spectroscopy up to now. A new production process makes the coating transparent - and the sensors suitable for special applications.
They have been used as standard in multimedia electronics for a long time, and now they are making rapid inroads in high performance applications: CMOS image sensors are no longer only used in cell phones and digital cameras. The automotive industry, for instance, has discovered the potential of optical semiconductor chips and is increasingly using them in driver assistance systems - from parking aids and road lane detection to blind-spot warning devices. In special applications, however, the sensors that convert light into electrical signals have to cope with difficult operating conditions, for example high temperatures and moisture.

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