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TOPIC: S. Delta Aquarid meteor shower


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RE: S. Delta Aquarid meteor shower
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The viewing peak for the Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower is July 29, 2011.
Hobbs State Park at Rogers in Northwest Arkansas is being touted as a great place to watch the celestial happenings.

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Southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower
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Summer meteor showers about to rev up

While the first summer shower won't come along until July 28 and 29, when the Southern Delta Aquarid meteors arrive, Nordgren is encouraging people to do some sky watching tonight, in observance of National Meteor Day. The day kicks off a two-week period during which the number of meteors gradually picks up to a high of up to 60 per hour.
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South Delta-Aquarids Meteor Shower
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South Delta-Aquarids Meteor Shower Peak in constellation Aquarius

ZHR=18.0
Velocity=42.0km/s (rather rapid)
Radiant: RA=22.7h/342° Dec=-15.4° (J2000)
Solar longitude=125.6° (J2000)

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RE: S. Delta Aquarid meteor shower
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First results from Large Hadron Collider announced
The Delta Aquarid Meteor shower peaks early Friday morning.
Sunrise is at 5:37 AM so the best time for viewing will be very early morning, 2 to 3 AM.
Look to the south-southeast to wish upon a shooting star.

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Southern Delta Aquarids
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The best time of the year to see meteors is from late July through August.
That was the word yesterday from Daniel LeBlanc of Dieppe, past president of the Beauséjour Astronomy Club.
Tomorrow and Thursday, for instance, will be the peak days for viewing the Southern Delta Aquarids (meteor shower) which will be in the eastern sky around midnight and through the early morning, said LeBlanc.
He said the Delta Aquarids can be seen from mid-July to mid-August.

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Southern Delta Aquariid meteor shower
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Title: Origin of the Marsden and Kracht Groups of Sunskirting Comets. I. Association with Comet 96P/Machholz and Its Interplanetary Complex
Authors: Zdenek Sekanina and Paul W. Chodas

Of the three major groups of comets approaching the Sun to between 6 and 12 solar radii and discovered with the coronagraphs on board SOHO, we investigate theMarsden and Kracht groups.We call these comets "sunskirters" to distinguish them from the Kreutz system sungrazers. Our objective is to understand the origin, history, and orbital evolution of the two groups. The tendency for their members to arrive at perihelion in pairs or clusters is a result of their recent fragmentation. As fragments of more massive precursor objects, the Marsden- and Kracht-group comets are mostly less than 10 yr old. Although the two groups and several meteoroid swarms, such as the Daytime Arietids and Southern delta Aquarids, appear as separate populations of a complex associated with comet 96P/Machholz, our orbit integrations suggest that we deal with a single, essentially continuous population that extends from the comet's orbit for more than 160° in the longitude of the node. First-generation fragments of their common progenitor with comet 96P, which were the initial direct ancestors of this population, are called the first precursors. Nearly 60,000 orbit integration runs are made in our search for their birth scenarios. We find that these objects separated from the progenitor comet before AD 950 and, as sources of continuing activity, pursued an orbital evolution very different from that of 96P. All first precursors of this low-inclination population experienced a sequence of encounters with Jupiter within 0.5 AU, starting in AD 1059 or earlier and continuing for centuries. In the process, they split into smaller pieces in a fashion reminiscent of "cascading" fragmentation of the Kreutz system. The secular planetary (mainly Jovian) perturbations control the motions of both 96P and the low-inclination population, but the dynamical evolution of the latter has been markedly accelerated by Jupiter during close encounters, so that the population's present-day orbital changes are similar to those the comet will undergo centuries from now. Precursors to the Southern delta Aquarids of the 1950s passed through theMarsden-group stage around 1700 and through the Kracht-group stage in the 1780s. The Daytime Arietids appear to be related most directly to the Marsden-group comets, which can closely approach Earth around June 12, the time of the stream's peak activity.

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S. Delta Aquarid meteor shower
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Delta Aquarids
Comet of origin: unknown
Radiant: constellation Aquarius
Active: July 14-Aug. 18
Peak Activity: No definite peak, but nights surrounding July 30 may be best
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 15 meteors per hour (northern hemisphere). Unfortunately, an almost-full moon will obscure many a meteor during this year's peak.
Time of optimal viewing: An hour or two before dawn. Meteor watchers in the southern hemisphere and in the northern hemisphere's tropical latitudes will enjoy the best views.
Meteor Velocity: 42 kilometers per second

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Delta Aquarids meteor shower falls over the Dee Estuary
Bright meteors were spotted falling towards West Kirby.

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Summer meteor showers
If you've noticed an increase in the number of shooting stars in recent nights, there's good reason. This month's annual Delta Aquarid meteor shower is increasing in activity as we get closer to its peak in the morning July 29. Other minor showers, such as the Kappa Cygnids and the Capricornids, also are throwing in a few meteors.

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Phan Van Dong, Vice Chairman of the Vietnam Astronomy Association, said a shower of falling stars will appear in the sky of Vietnam in the early morning on July 29.

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The Southern Delta Aquarids are a meteor shower visible from mid July to mid August each year with peak activity on July 28 or 29 July.

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