* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Nasa sea level change


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Global sea levels
Permalink  
 


Sea levels could rise by more than three metres, shows new study

Global sea levels could rise by more than three metres - over half a metre more than previously thought - this century alone, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Southampton scientist.
Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
RE: Nasa sea level change
Permalink  
 


Accelerated Warming of the Continental Shelf Off Northeast Coast

A couple of unexplained large scale changes in the waters off the northeast coast of the U.S. have oceanographers perplexed: an accelerated rate of sea level rise compared to most other parts of the world; and the disturbing signs of collapsing fisheries in the region.
Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
US sea level
Permalink  
 


US sea level north of New York City 'jumped by 128mm'

Sea levels along the northeast coast of the US rose by record levels during 2009-2010, a study has found.
Sea levels north of New York City rose by 128mm in two years, according to a report in the journal, Nature Communications.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Sea level rise
Permalink  
 


New dating of sea-level records reveals rapid response between ice volume and polar temperature

A new study has revealed a rapid response between global temperature and ice volume/sea-level, which could lead to sea-levels rising by over one metre.
During the last few million years, global ice-volume variability has been one of the main feedback mechanisms in climate change, because of the strong reflective properties of large ice sheets. Ice volume changes in ancient times can be reconstructed from sea-level records. However, detailed assessment of the role of ice volume in climate change is hindered by inadequacies in sea-level records and/or their timescales.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Sea level change
Permalink  
 


Satellites trace sea level change

A major reassessment of 18 years of satellite observations has provided a new, more detailed view of sea-level change around the world.
Incorporating the data from a number of spacecraft, the study re-affirms that ocean waters globally are rising by just over 3mm/yr.
But that figure, according to the reassessment, hides some very big regional differences - up and down.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Permalink  
 

New predictions for sea level rise
Fossil coral data and temperature records derived from ice-core measurements have been used to place better constraints on future sea level rise, and to test sea level projections.
The results are published today in Nature Geoscience and predict that the amount of sea level rise by the end of this century will be between 7 - 82 cm - depending on the amount of warming that occurs - a figure similar to that projected by the IPCC report of 2007.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Permalink  
 

More than 1 billion people live in low-lying areas where a sudden surge in sea level could prove as disastrous as the 2004 Asian tsunami, according to new research presented on Thursday.
New mapping techniques show how much land would be lost and how many people affected by rapid sea level rises that are often triggered by storms and earthquakes, a U.S. Geological Survey-led team determined.
E. Lynn Usery, who led the team, said nearly one-quarter of the world's population lives below 100 feet above sea level -- the size of the biggest surge during the 2004 tsunami that pulverised villages along the Indian Ocean and killed 230,000 people.
A rise of just 16 feet would affect 669 million people and 2 million square miles of land would be lost.
Sea levels are currently rising about 0.04 to 0.08 inches each year, making it unlikely such a scenario would suddenly occur across the globe.
But he said 10,000 years ago sea levels rose 20 metres in 500 years -- a relatively short span -- after the collapse of the continental ice sheets.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 130035
Date:
Nasa sea level change
Permalink  
 


NASA PRESENTS BREAKTHROUGH DISCOVERIES ON SEA LEVEL CHANGE

For the first time, scientists have the tools and expertise to measure changes in global sea level and understand the mechanisms that contribute to those changes. Scientists from NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other respected climate research institutions will address factors that lead to sea level change at a NASA Science Update on Thursday, July 7 at 1 p.m. EDT.

The Update will be in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW, Washington.

Panellists:

* Dr. Waleed Abdalati, Head, Cryospheric Sciences Branch, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, Md.
* Dr. Steve Nerem, Associate Director, Colorado Centre for Astrodynamics Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo.
* Dr. Eric Rignot, research scientist for the Radar Science and Engineering Section, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
* Dr. Laury Miller, Chief, Satellite Altimetry Laboratory, NOAA, Washington
* Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor, Department of Geosciences and EMS Environment Institute, Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pa.


NASA TV will carry the conference live with question-and-answer capability from participating NASA centres.


__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard