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Posts: 129658
Date:
NGC 7000
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The North America nebula (not recorded at center) and Deneb, Cygnus

Picture 841



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L

Posts: 129658
Date:
North America nebula
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The North America Nebula (NGC 7000 or Caldwell 20) is an emission nebula discovered by William Herschel on October 24, 1786, from Slough, England.
The nebula was first photographed by Max Wolf in Heidelberg on the 12th December 1890.

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Posts: 129658
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W80 Complex
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Title: DEFPOS H\alpha Observations of W80 Complex
Authors: Naz\im Aksaker

We present H{\alpha} emission line measurements of the W80 nebular complex. A total of 26 regions have been observed inside the nebula with the Dual Etalon Fabry-Perot Optical Spectrometer (DEFPOS) system at the f/48 Coude focus of 150 cm RTT150 telescope located at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Antalya/Turkey. The intensities, the local standard of rest (LSR) velocities (V_{LSR}), heliocentric radial velocities (V_{HEL}) and the linewidths at Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the H{\alpha} emission lines have been determined from these observations. They lie in the range of 259 to 1159 Rayleigh {1R = 10^{6}/4\pi photons cm^{-2} sr^{-1} s^{-1} = 2.4110^{-7} erg cm^{-2} sr^{-1} s^{-1} at H{\alpha}.} (R), 4 to 12 km s^{-1} and 44 to 55 km s^{-1}, respectively. The radial velocity measurements show that there are several maxima and minima inside the W80. The new results confirm the literature that complex seems to be rather a uniform in radial velocity and no seen turbulent motion inside the complex. The average value of the calculated the Emission Measure (EM) for the regions is 3.1 pc cm^{-6}.

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Date:
NGC 7000
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New View of Family Life in the North American Nebula

This swirling landscape of stars is known as the North American nebula. In visible light, the region resembles North America, but in this new infrared view from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the continent disappears.
Where did the continent go? The reason you don't see it in Spitzer's view has to do, in part, with the fact that infrared light can penetrate dust whereas visible light cannot. Dusty, dark clouds in the visible image become transparent in Spitzer's view. In addition, Spitzer's infrared detectors pick up the glow of dusty cocoons enveloping baby stars.

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Posts: 129658
Date:
North America nebula
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This image in representative colours shows a hot bed of gas, dust, and newly formed stars known as the Cygnus Wall.


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The star forming wall is lit and eroded by bright young stars, and partly hidden by the dark dust they have created.
It is part of the North America nebula (NGC 7000) that spans about 15 light years and lies about 1,500 light years away toward the constellation of Cygnus.





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