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RE: Quantum entanglement
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Reality just got a one-two punch. A new experiment has tried to suss out which of two counterintuitive ingredients is more basic to quantum theory, only to find that they go hand in hand.
Einstein was famously bugged by what are now well-established facts of quantum theory: the randomness of a particle's choices and the possibility of instantaneous linkages between far-flung light or matter. Experimenters now conclude that Einstein cannot even pick his poison, because allowing for instant links kills any simple notion of reality, too.
The team updated a classic 1982 experiment in which researchers measured the polarisations, or spatial orientations, of twin pairs of photons. In quantum theory, photons and other particles do not have definite values for properties such as location or polarisation but rather acquire a specific property randomly when measured in an experiment.

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The reach of the spooky quantum link called entanglement keeps getting longer. A team has transmitted entangled photons some 144 kilometres between La Palma and Tenerife, two of Spain's Canary Islands off the coast of Morocco. Physicist Anton Zeilinger of the University of Vienna, the group's leader, presented the results to his colleagues this week at the American Physical Society conference.
The distance achieved is 10 times farther than entangled photons have ever flown through the air. When two photons or other particles are in this state, what happens to one determines the fate of the other, no matter how far apart they are. Zeilinger compares the phenomenon with throwing a pair of dice that land on matching numbers every time.

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Mass
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Title: On Origin of Mass and Supersymmetry
Authors: Kazunari Shima, Motomu Tsuda

We show that the nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity gives new insights into the origin of mass and elucidates the mysterious relations between the cosmology and the (low energy) particle physics.

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Zero-point energy
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Equinox - It Runs on Water (Free Energy - 1995)
On Sunday, 17 December 1995, viewers in U.K. saw an hour-long T V. program which, at long last, puts across the clear message that "free energy" is on the way.

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At long last researchers have teleported the information stored in a beam of light into a cloud of atoms, which is about as close to getting beamed up by Scotty as we're likely to come in the foreseeable future. More practically, the demonstration is key to eventually harnessing quantum effects for hyperpowerful computing or ultrasecure encryption systems.

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A U.S. physicist has discovered powerful magnetic fields alter the physical nature of superconductivity.
University of Arizona Associate Professor of Physics Andrei Lebed has determined strong magnetism changes the basic, intrinsic properties of electrons flowing through superconductors -- thereby establishing an "exotic" superconductivity.

"Understanding the physical nature of the electron pairs that define superconductors is one of the most important problems in condensed matter physics" - Andrei Lebed .

He said the work is one of the most important contributions to physics during his 20-year career.

"We show that superconducting electron pairs are not unchanged elementary particles, but, rather, complex objects with characteristics that depend on the strength of a magnetic field" - Andrei Lebed .

He published the research earlier this year in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Quantum Teleportation
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The first experimental demonstration of quantum telecloning has been achieved by scientists at the University of Tokyo, the Japan Science and Technology Agency, and the University of York. The work is reported in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters. Telecloning combines cloning (or copying) with teleportation (i.e., disembodied transport).

The scientists have succeeded in making the first remote copies of beams of laser light, by combining quantum cloning with quantum teleportation into a single experimental step. Telecloning is more efficient than any combination of teleportation and local cloning because it relies on a new form of quantum entanglement - multipartite entanglement.

"Quantum mechanics allows us to do things which we previously thought were impossible. In 1998, I was involved in an experiment in America which was one of the first for quantum teleportation in which we transmitted a beam of light without it crossing the physical medium in between. This new experiment is an extension of that work. Whether it will change the world for individuals or is just of use to governments or big companies is hard to say. Any new protocol is like a new-born baby and it has to develop, but we know this one could be used to tap cryptographic channels. Quantum cryptographic protocols are so secure that they can not only discover tapping but also where and how much information is leaking out. Now, using telecloning, the identity and location of the eavesdropper can be concealed" - Professor Sam Braunstein, Department of Computer Science at York.

Telecloning and teleportation may no longer be theories, but we are still a long way from teleporting people.

"What we know is that it would be incredibly difficult and from the perspective of today's technology, a completely outrageous thing. But in 100 years, who knows?" - Professor Sam Braunstein.

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Quantum entanglement
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Quantum entanglement for kids.
Explained “by way of colourful pictures, helpful analogies, and absolutely no math.”

Check the website out HERE

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RE: Mass
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Where mass comes from is one of the deepest mysteries of nature but now a controversial new theory points the finger at matter in a quantum vacuum.

Where mass comes from is one of the deepest mysteries of nature.
Now a controversial theory suggests that mass comes from the interaction of matter with the quantum vacuum that pervades the universe.
The theory was previously used to explain inertial mass - the property of matter that resists acceleration - but it has been extended to gravitational mass, which is the property of matter that feels the tug of gravity.
For decades, mainstream opinion has held that something called the Higgs field gives matter its mass, mediated by a particle called the Higgs boson. But no one has yet seen the Higgs boson, despite considerable time and money spent looking for it in particle accelerators.

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Quantum physics predicts the existence of an underlying sea of zero-point energy at every point in the universe. This is different from the cosmic microwave background and is also referred to as the electromagnetic quantum vacuum since it is the lowest state of otherwise empty space. This energy is so enormous that most physicists believe that even though zero-point energy seems to be an inescapable consequence of elementary quantum theory, it cannot be physically real, and so is subtracted away in calculations.
A minority of physicists accept it as real energy which we cannot directly sense since it is the same everywhere, even inside our bodies and measuring devices. From this perspective, the ordinary world of matter and energy is like foam atop the quantum vacuum sea. It does not matter to a ship how deep the ocean is below it. If the zero-point energy is real, there is the possibility that it can be tapped as a source of power or be harnessed to generate a propulsive force for space travel.

The basis of zero-point energy is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, one of the fundamental laws of quantum physics. According to this principle, the more precisely one measures the position of a moving particle, such as an electron, the less exact the best possible measurement of momentum (mass times velocity) will be, and vice versa. The least possible uncertainty of position times momentum is specified by Planck's constant, h. A parallel uncertainty exists between measurements involving time and energy. This minimum uncertainty is not due to any correctable flaws in measurement, but rather reflects an intrinsic quantum fuzziness in the very nature of energy and matter.

Radio waves, light, X-rays, and gamma rays are all forms of electromagnetic radiation. Classically, electromagnetic radiation can be pictured as waves flowing through space at the speed of light. The waves are not waves of anything substantive, but are in fact ripples in a state of a field. These waves do carry energy, and each wave has a specific direction, frequency and polarization state. This is called a "propagating mode of the electromagnetic field."
Each mode is subject to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. To understand the meaning of this, the theory of electromagnetic radiation is quantized by treating each mode as an equivalent harmonic oscillator. From this analogy, every mode of the field must have hf/2 as its average minimum energy.
That is a tiny amount of energy, but the number of modes is enormous, and indeed increases as the square of the frequency. The product of the tiny energy per mode times the huge spatial density of modes yields a very high theoretical energy density per cubic centimetre.

From this line of reasoning, quantum physics predicts that all of space must be filled with electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations (also called the zero-point field) creating a universal sea of zero-point energy. The density of this energy depends critically on where in frequency the zero-point fluctuations cease. Since space itself is thought to break up into a kind of quantum foam at a tiny distance scale called the Planck scale (10e-33 cm), it is argued that the zero point fluctuations must cease at a corresponding Planck frequency (10e43 Hz). If that is the case, the zero-point energy density would be 110 orders of magnitude greater than the radiant energy at the centre of the Sun.

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RE:Negative Information
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In the quantum world, information can be negative.

Research by Michal Horodecki, Jonathan Oppenheim and Andreas Winter, appears in the current edition of the journal Nature.
The researchers hope to use this to gain deeper insights into phenomena such as quantum teleportation, quantum entanglement, as well as other insights into the quantum world.

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Given an unknown quantum state distributed over two systems, the researchers determine how much quantum communication is needed to transfer the full state to one system.
This communication measures the "partial information" one system needs conditioned on its prior information. It turns out to be given by an extremely simple formula, the conditional entropy.
In the classical case, partial information must always be positive, but they found that in the quantum world this physical quantity can be negative. If the partial information is positive, its sender needs to communicate this number of quantum bits to the receiver; if it is negative, the sender and receiver instead gain the corresponding potential for future quantum communication.
The researcher propose that a primitive "quantum state merging" optimally transfers partial information.

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