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First close-ups of Jupiter's Great Red Spot from Juno flyby

We've taken our first close-up look at the biggest storm in our solar system. On 10 June, NASA's Juno spacecraft flew closer to Jupiters Great Red Spot than ever before, passing about 9,000 kilometres over its swirling clouds.
The first images from the flyby have arrived, showing the tops of clouds stirred by winds at speeds well over 600 kilometres per hour. Kevin Gill, a software engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California has already processed some of the raw images taken by spacecraft.

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Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot at ~02:06 UTC, 11th July 2017.

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NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno's sixth science flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops. Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter's center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 3,500 kilometers above the planet's cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 39,771 kilometers and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will pass about 9,000 kilometers above the Giant Red Spot clouds. All eight of the spacecraft's instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, will be on during the flyby. 
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Juno probe peers below Jupiter's clouds

Scientists working on the American space agency's new Juno mission say its initial observations at Jupiter have taken their breath away.
In particular, they have been amazed by the storms seen at the planet's poles.

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NASA to Discuss First Science Results from Juno Mission to Jupiter

Scientists from NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter will discuss their first in-depth science results in a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT Thursday, May 25, when multiple papers with early findings will be published online by the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters
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NASA's Juno Mission Exits Safe Mode, Performs Trim Manoeuvre

NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter has left safe mode and has successfully completed a minor burn of its thruster engines in preparation for its next close flyby of Jupiter.
Mission controllers commanded Juno to exit safe mode Monday, Oct. 24, with confirmation of safe mode exit received on the ground at 10:05 a.m. PDT (1:05 p.m. EDT). The spacecraft entered safe mode on Oct. 18 when a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The team is still investigating the cause of the reboot and assessing two main engine check valves.
 
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Juno Spacecraft in Safe Mode for Latest Jupiter Flyby Scientists Intrigued by Data from First Flyby

NASA's Juno spacecraft entered safe mode Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). Early indications are a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer.
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Mission Prepares for Next Jupiter Pass

Mission managers for NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter have decided to postpone the upcoming burn of its main rocket motor originally scheduled for Oct. 19. This burn, called the period reduction manoeuvre (PRM), was to reduce Juno's orbital period around Jupiter from 53.4 to 14 days. The decision was made in order to further study the performance of a set of valves that are part of the spacecraft's fuel pressurization system. The period reduction manoeuvre was the final scheduled burn of Juno's main engine.
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NASA's Juno Team to Discuss Jupiter Mission Status, Latest Science Results

Team members of NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter will discuss the latest science results, an amateur imaging processing campaign, and the recent decision to postpone a scheduled burn of its main engine, during a media briefing at 4 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 19. The briefing will air live on NASA Television and stream on the agency's website.
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Title: A possible new test of general relativity with Juno
Authors: L. Iorio

The expansion in multipoles of the gravitational potential of a rotating body affects the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting it with long-term perturbations both at a classical and at a relativistic level. In this preliminary sensitivity analysis, we show that, for the first time, the J2 c^-2 effects could be measured by the ongoing Juno mission in the gravitational field of Jupiter during its yearlong science phase (10 November 2016-5 October 2017) thanks to its high eccentricity (e=0.947) and to the huge oblateness of Jupiter (J2=1.47 10^-2). The semi-major axis a and the perijove \omega\ of Juno are expected to be shifted by \Delta a =700-900 m and \Delta\omega = 50-60 milliarcseconds, respectively, over 1-2 yr. A numerical analysis shows also that the expected J2c^-2 range-rate signal for Juno should be as large as 280 microns per second during a typical 6 h pass at its closest approach. Independent analyses previously performed by other researchers about the measurability of the Lense-Thirring effect showed that the radio science apparatus of Juno should reach an accuracy in Doppler range-rate measurements of 1-5 microns per second over such passes. The range-rate signature of the classical even zonal perturbations is different from the 1PN one. Thus, further investigations, based on covariance analyses of simulated Doppler data and dedicated parameters estimation, are worth of further consideration. It turns out that the J2 c^-2 effects cannot be responsible of the flyby anomaly in the gravitational field of the Earth. A dedicated spacecraft in a 6678 km X 57103 km polar orbit would experience a geocentric J2 c^-2 range-rate shift of 0.4 mm s^-1.

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