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TOPIC: Younger Dryas Impact


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RE: Younger Dryas Impact
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At least once in Earths history, global warming ended quickly, and scientists have long wondered why.
Now researchers are reporting that the abrupt cooling which took place about 12,900 years ago, just as the planet was emerging from an ice age may have been caused by one or more meteors that slammed into North America.
That could explain the extinction of mammoths, saber-tooth tigers and maybe even the first human inhabitants of the Americas, the scientists report in Fridays issue of the journal Science.

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For years Sheriden Cave, west of Carey, has been recognised as one of the foremost archaeological sites in the Americas, if not the world. At the cave scientists have unearthed extinct animal species and artifacts that have been undisturbed since the last ice age.
Recently, however, excavations by Dr. Ken Tankersley, an archaeologist from the University of Cincinnati, have uncovered evidence that indicate an extraterrestrial event some 13,000 years ago may have permanently altered the course of history in the Americas and possibly the whole world.

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A devastating collision between the Earth and a wayward comet which wiped out nearly every living thing across an entire continent will happen again and cost millions of lives, a Westcountry scientist claims.
The three-mile wide comet, named Clovis after the fledgling North American civilisation it drove to extinction, exploded in the atmosphere 13,000 years ago with a force of 20 million megatons larger than a simultaneous blast by all the nuclear weapons in history, says Professor Chris Turney, of the University of Exeter.

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Younger Dryas Cooling
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A drastic cooling of the climate in western Europe happened exactly 12,679 years ago, apparently after a shift to icy winds over the Atlantic, scientists said on Friday, giving a hint of how abruptly the climate can change.
The study, of pollens, minerals and other matter deposited in annual layers at the bottom of Lake Meerfelder Maar in Germany, pinpointed an abrupt change in sediments consistent with a sudden chill over just one year.

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Younger Dryas Impact
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Younger Dryas (YD) Impact AGU Press Conference

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American Geophysical Union Press Conference, Acapulco, Mexico, May 23, 2007 - Part 1 of 7

Investigations of a buried layer at sites from California to Belgium reveal materials that include metallic microspherules, carbon spherules, nanodiamonds, fullerenes, charcoal, and soot. The layer's composition may indicate that a massive body, possibly a comet, exploded in the atmosphere over the Laurentide Ice Sheet 12,900 years ago. The timing coincides with a great die-off of mammoths and other North American megafauna and the onset of a period of cooling in Northern Europe and elswhere known as the Younger Dryas Event. The American Clovis culture appears to have been dramatically effected, even terminated, at this same time. Speakers will discuss numerous lines of evidence contributing to the impact hypothesis. The nature and frequency of this new kind of impact event could have major implications for our understanding of extinctions and climate change.

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American Geophysical Union (AGU) Press Conference - Part 2 of 7

Investigations of a buried layer at sites from California to Belgium reveal materials that include metallic microspherules, carbon spherules, nanodiamonds, fullerenes, charcoal, and soot. The layer's composition may indicate that a massive body, possibly a comet, exploded in the atmosphere over the Laurentide Ice Sheet 12,900 years ago. The timing coincides with a great die-off of mammoths and other North American megafauna and the onset of a period of cooling in Northern Europe and elswhere known as the Younger Dryas Event. The American Clovis culture appears to have been dramatically effected, even terminated, at this same time. Speakers will discuss numerous lines of evidence contributing to the impact hypothesis. The nature and frequency of this new kind of impact event could have major implications for our understanding of extinctions and climate change.

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American Geophysical Union (AGU) Press Conference - Part 3 of 7



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AGU Press Conference - Part 4 of 7




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AGU Press Conference - Part 5 of 7




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American Geophysical Union (AGU) Press Conference, Acapulco, Mexico, May 23, 2007 - Part 6 of 7



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AGU Press Conference - Part 7 of 7




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Scientists investigate whether a meteor could have killed the woolly mammoth.



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