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Title: Formation and evolution of the Magellanic Clouds. II. Structure and kinematics of the Small Magellanic Cloud
Authors: Kenji Bekki, Masashi Chiba

We investigate structural, kinematical, and chemical properties of stars and gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) interacting with the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Galaxy based on a series of self-consistent chemodynamical simulations. We adopt a new ``dwarf spheroidal model'' in which the SMC initially has both old stars with a spherical spatial distribution and an extended HI gas disk. We mainly investigate SMC's evolution for the last 3 Gyr within which the Magellanic stream (MS) and the Magellanic bridge (MB) can be formed as a result of the LMC-SMC-Galaxy interaction. Our principal results, which can be tested against observations, are as follows. The final spatial distribution of the old stars projected onto the sky is spherical even after the strong LMC-SMC-Galaxy interaction, whereas that of the new ones is significantly flattened and appears to form a bar structure. Old stars have the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (sigma) of ~ 30 km/s and slow rotation with the maximum rotational velocity (V) of less than slow rotation with the maximum rotational velocity (V) of less than 20 km/s and show asymmetry in the radial profiles. New stars have a smaller sigma than old ones and a significant amount of rotation (V/sigma >1). HI gas shows velocity dispersions of sigma = 10-40 km/s a high maximum rotational velocity (V ~ 50 km/s), and the spatial distribution similar to that of new stars. The new stars with ages younger than 3 Gyr show a negative metallicity gradient in the sense that more metal-rich stars are located in the inner regions of the SMC.

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Title: The many streams of the Magellanic Stream
Authors: Snezana Stanimirovic, Samantha Hoffman (UW Madison), Carl Heiles (UC Berkeley), Kevin A. Douglas (SSL, UC Berkeley), Mary Putman (Univ. of Michigan), Joshua E. G. Peek (UC Berkeley)

We present results from neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of the tip of the Magellanic Stream (MS), obtained with the Arecibo telescope as a part of the on-going survey by the Consortium for Galactic studies with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array. We find four large-scale, coherent HI streams, extending continuously over a length of 20 degrees, each stream possessing different morphology and velocity gradients. The newly discovered streams provide strong support for the tidal model of the MS formation by Connors et al. (2006), which suggested a spatial and kinematic bifurcation of the MS. The observed morphology and kinematics suggest that three of these streams could be interpreted as a 3-way splitting of the main MS filament, while the fourth stream appears much younger and may have originated from the Magellanic Bridge.
We find an extensive population of HI clouds at the tip of the MS. Two thirds of clouds have an angular size in the range 3.5'--10'. We interpret this as being due to thermal instability, which would affect a warm tail of gas trailing through the Galactic halo over a characteristic timescale of a few Myrs to a few hundred Myrs. We show that thermal fragments can survive in the hot halo for a long time, especially if surrounded by a <10^6 K halo gas. If the observed clumpy structure is mainly due to thermal instability, then the tip of the MS is at a distance of ~70 kpc. A significant fraction of HI clouds at the tip of the MS show multi-phase velocity profiles, indicating the co-existence of cooler and warmer gas.

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Title: Breaking up the Magellanic Group into the Milky Way Halo: understanding the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy properties
Authors: Elena D'Onghia (University of Zurich)

We use a numerical simulation of a loose group containing a Milky Way halo to probe that in the hierarchical universe the Magellanic Clouds and some dSphs have been accreted into the Milky Way halo from a late infalling group of dwarfs. Our simulations show that the tidal breakup of the Magellanic group occurs before it enters the Milky Way halo. Only half of the satellites contributed from the group are predicted to be inside the Milky Way virial radius. Half of its subhalos survive outside the current virial radius in the form of satellites, whereas the remaining material contributes to the diffuse Milky Way halo. At z~0 the disrupted group contributes less than 10% to the Milky Way halo mass but 20% of the brightest dwarf galaxies of the Milky Way have been part of this group. This scenario points out that some dSphs might have been form away from giant spirals and been accreted already as spheroids, by a late infall group in contrast with the classical picture of tidal stripping of dSph formation models. This would naturally explain several peculiarities of the local dSph: why Draco and the other luminous dSphs exist compared to other ultra-faint satellite galaxies, the location of Tucana and Cetus in the outskirts of the Local Group and the mismatch in metallicity between the stellar halo of the Milky Way and the dwarf galaxies that many have suspected dissolved to build it.

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Title: An Interaction of a Magellanic Leading Arm High Velocity Cloud with the Milky Way Disk
Authors: N. M. McClure-Griffiths, L. Staveley-Smith, F. J. Lockman, M. R. Calabretta, H. A. Ford, P. M. W. Kalberla, T. Murphy, H. Nakanishi, D. J. Pisano

The Leading Arm of the Magellanic System is a tidally formed HI feature extending ~ 60\arcdeg$ from the Magellanic Clouds ahead of their direction of motion. Using atomic hydrogen (HI) data from the Galactic All Sky-Survey (GASS), supplemented with data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we have found evidence for an interaction between a cloud in the Leading Arm and the Galactic disk where the Leading Arm crosses the Galactic plane. The interaction occurs at velocities permitted by Galactic rotation, which allows us to derive a kinematic distance to the cloud of 21 kpc, suggesting that the Leading Arm crosses the Galactic Plane at a Galactic radius of R ~x 17 kpc.

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Title: Young stellar populations in the Magellanic Clouds
Authors: A. Vallenari

We discuss the young population of stars and clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. We present the discovery of pre-main sequence candidates in the nebula N~11 in the Large Magellanic Clouds using HST ACS photometry. The comparison of the Colour-Magnitude diagram with pre-main sequence tracks and the presence of Spitzer objects YSO I and II suggest that the star formation has been active for a long period in the region, from a few 10^5 yrs to several Myr ago

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