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TOPIC: Climate change


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RE: Climate change
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Ice loss from glaciers and ice caps is expected to cause more global sea rise during this century than the massive Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study.
The researchers found that glaciers and ice caps are currently contributing about 60 percent of the world's ice to the oceans and the rate has been markedly accelerating in the past decade, said Professor Emeritus Mark Meier of CU-Boulder's Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, lead study author. The contribution is presently about 100 cubic miles of ice annually -- a volume nearly equal to the water in Lake Erie -- and is rising by about three cubic miles per year.

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Carbon offset companies
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Raft of flaws found in popular carbon offsetting schemes ...
An episode of Dispatches on Channel 4 on Monday entitled "The Great Green Smoke" ... Two of the country's biggest carbon offset companies, the Carbon Neutral Company (TCNC) and , Climate Care have been shown to have  little or no real contribution to cutting emissions.
The green energy tariffs look appealing, but research commissioned for Dispatches shows they often don't make a watt of difference.

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RE: Climate change
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A new assessment of land and sea level changes in London and the Thames estuary has been made by scientists.
Their study - based on tide gauge, GPS, gravity, and satellite measurements - shows a general pattern of subsidence of 1-2mm a year.
With waters rising in the region by about 1mm a year, the combined effect is a 2-3mm a year rise in sea level with respect to the land.
The study has been conducted for the Environment Agency.

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A new scientific study concludes that changes in the Sun's output cannot be causing modern-day climate change.
It shows that for the last 20 years, the Sun's output has declined, yet temperatures on Earth have risen.
It also shows that modern temperatures are not determined by the Sun's effect on cosmic rays, as has been claimed.
Writing in the Royal Society's journal Proceedings A, the researchers say cosmic rays may have affected climate in the past, but not the present.

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The public believes the effects of global warming on the climate are not as bad as politicians and scientists claim, a poll has suggested.
The Ipsos Mori poll of 2,032 adults - interviewed between 14 and 20 June - found 56% believed scientists were still questioning climate change.
There was a feeling the problem was exaggerated to make money, it found.
The Royal Society said most climate scientists believed humans were having an "unprecedented" effect on climate.
The survey suggested that terrorism, graffiti, crime and dog mess were all of more concern than climate change.

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 Coastal cities in the US, Canada, Japan, Indonesia, India and Turkey are teetering on the brink of natural disasters, a meeting at Lloyds has been told.
The gloomy message was spelt out at an otherwise celebratory event, a presentation to mark the 10th anniversary of Benfield UCL Hazard Research Centre, which has carried out acclaimed research in catastrophe and climate forecasting.
Bill McGuire, director of the centre which is backed by the Benfield broking group and the prestigious London university UCL, said that climate change was the joker in the pack which meant that at present scientists had one hand tied behind their backs when attempting to predict hazards.

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A new report released Wednesday finds that North Carolinas coastline will continue to experience significant loss in land area, property and recreational value in the next 30 to 75 years due to projected changes in climate, leading North Carolina researchers announced.
The findings appear in the report Measuring the Impacts of Climate Change on North Carolina Coastal Resources, which assesses the impact of rising sea levels on property values, recreation and quality of life, and was conducted by researchers from Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, University of North Carolina Wilmington and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. The study finds that:

North Carolinas coastal topography makes it especially vulnerable to sea level rise and hurricanesboth economically and ecologically.

A one- to three-foot rise in sea level along four North Carolina coastal counties could mean billions of dollars in private property losses over the next 75 years.

Recreational fishing and beach trips also are vulnerable to increased erosion from sea level rise and hurricanes.

Business interruption losses from hurricanes could increase by as much as $157 million per storm event by 2080.


The study surveyed the counties of New Hanover, Dare, Carteret and Bertie. These four counties represent a cross-section of the North Carolina coastline in geographical distribution and economic development, according to the study. Researchers found that North Carolinas coast is highly vulnerable to climate change, and looked at the economic impact global warming could have on its resources. They also considered how sea level rise would affect damage to property values, coastal recreation and tourism.

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