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Water telescope uses gamma rays to track new kind of pulsar

Astronomers might have found a novel way to track down pulsars, the rapidly spinning corpses of massive stars - and the process may have uncovered a new species of pulsar too.
Tim Linden at Ohio State University in Columbus has a way to find them. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory - made up of 300 water tanks on a mountaintop in central Mexico - can detect gamma radiation produced by the interaction between charged particles emitted by the pulsars and the gas between stars.
Linden says HAWC can track down previously unknown pulsars, because the gamma-ray emission region covers a bigger part of the sky than radio or X-ray - a few square degrees - and the observatory is designed to look at wider fields than average radio telescopes or orbiting X-ray telescopes. Mapping the location of those gamma-emitting regions can tell the X-ray and radio telescopes where to look to confirm whether a pulsar is present.

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HAWC gamma-ray observatory
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Title: First year results of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory.
Author: Alberto Carramiņana, for the HAWC Collaboration

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (1.8 Sr) and high duty cycle (>95% up-time) detector of unique capabilities for the study of TeV gamma-ray sources. Installed at an altitude of 4100m in the Northern slope of Volc\'an Sierra Negra, Puebla, by a collaboration of about thirty institutions of Mexico and the United States, HAWC has been in full operations since March 2015, surveying 2/3 of the sky every sidereal day, monitoring active galaxies and mapping sources in the Galactic Plane to a detection level of 1 Crab per day. This contribution summarizes the main results of the first year of observations of the HAWC gamma-ray observatory.

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Here comes HAWC: New observatory to seek out gamma rays

High on a sleeping Mexican volcano, a new particle astrophysics observatory is about to blink to life, commencing an all-sky search for very high-energy gamma rays - a search that could greatly expand the catalogue of known gamma ray sources and chip away at the mystery of the cosmic rays that constantly bombard our planet.
The observatory, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), is a partnership between the United States and Mexico and is designed to gather the highest-energy gamma rays. The rays are particles of light with energies that are orders of magnitude higher than ordinary photons or even X-rays.

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Hawc gamma-ray telescope captures its first image

A new set of "eyes" to capture the Universe's highest-energy particles and light has snapped its first image.
The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory or Hawc, high on a Mexican plain, now holds the record for the highest-energy light it can capture.

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Hawc telescope snaps its first image

Hawc gamma-ray telescope, which aims to capture the Universe's highest-energy particles and light, has snapped its first-ever image.
The picture of the shadow cast by the Moon as it blocks the light and particles was presented at a meeting of the American Physical Society.
The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (Hawc), located on flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near Puebla, Mexico, now holds the record for the highest-energy light it can capture.
 
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The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC, is a facility designed to observe TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays with an instantaneous aperture that covers more than 15% of the sky. With this large field of view, the detector will be exposed to half of the sky during a 24-hour period. 
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