* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Umm al Binni Crater


L

Posts: 128137
Date:
RE: Umm al Binni Crater
Permalink  
 


The late Holocene Umm Al Binni meteorite impact structure in the marshlands of Southern Iraq.

Read more (2mb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 128137
Date:
Umm al Binni lake
Permalink  
 


Umm al Binni lake
ulumellake
Latitude 30.355096° Longitude 48.640148°

See The Garden of Eden

__________________


L

Posts: 128137
Date:
RE: Umm al Binni Crater
Permalink  
 


The devastating meteor impact in the Middle East might have triggered the mysterious collapse of civilisations more than 4,000 years ago.

Studies of satellite images of southern Iraq have revealed a two-mile-wide circular depression which scientists say bears all the hallmarks of an impact crater. If confirmed, it would point to the Middle East being struck by a meteor with the violence equivalent to hundreds of nuclear bombs.

Until now, archaeologists have put forward a host of separate explanations for these events, from local wars to environmental changes. Recently, some astronomers have suggested that meteor impacts could explain such historical mysteries.

Today's crater lies on what would have been shallow sea 4,000 years ago, and any impact would have caused devastating fires and flooding.
The catastrophic effect of these could explain the mystery of why so many early cultures went into sudden decline around 2300 BC.
They include the demise of the Akkad culture of central Iraq, with its mysterious semi-mythological emperor Sargon; the end of the fifth dynasty of Egypt's Old Kingdom, following the building of the Great Pyramids and the sudden disappearance of hundreds of early settlements in the Holy Land.
Until now, archaeologists have put forward a host of separate explanations for these events, from local wars to environmental changes. Recently, some astronomers have suggested that meteor impacts could explain such historical mysteries.

The crater's faint outline was found by Dr Sharad Master, a geologist at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, on satellite images of the Al 'Amarah region, about 10 miles north-west of the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates and home of the Marsh Arabs.
The structure is a circular, slightly polygonal feature about 3.4 km in diameter, with a raised rim and a surrounding annulus, which is about 500 metres wide. Because it is found in very young alluvial sediments near the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the structure must have formed in the last 6 000 years.

"It was a purely accidental discovery. I was reading a magazine article about the canal-building projects of Saddam Hussein, and there was a photograph showing lots of formations - one of which was very, very circular" - Dr Sharad Master.

Detailed analysis of other satellite images taken since the mid-1980s showed that for many years the crater contained a small lake.
The draining of the region, as part of Saddam's campaign against the Marsh Arabs, has since caused the lake to recede, revealing a ring-like ridge inside the larger bowl-like depression - a classic feature of meteor impact craters.
The crater also appears to be, in geological terms, very recent.

"The sediments in this region are very young, so whatever caused the crater-like structure, it must have happened within the past 6,000 years" - Dr Sharad Master.

A survey of the crater itself could reveal tell-tale melted rock.
A date of around 2300 BC for the impact may also cast new light on the legend of Gilgamesh, dating from the same period. The legend talks of "the Seven Judges of Hell", who raised their torches, lighting the land with flame, and a storm that turned day into night, "smashed the land like a cup", and flooded the area.

"When God decided to bring about the Flood, He took two stars from Khima, threw them on Earth, and brought about the Flood."

The discovery of the crater has sparked great interest among scientists.
Dr Benny Peiser, who lectures on the effects of meteor impacts at John Moores University, Liverpool, said it was one of the most significant discoveries in recent years and would corroborate research he and others have done.
He said that craters recently found in Argentina date from around the same period - suggesting that the Earth may have been hit by a shower of large meteors at about the same time.



In 1988 the observation was made that narrowest-ring events in Irish sub-fossil oak chronologies appeared to line up with large acidities in the Greenland ice records from Camp Century and Dye3. Three of the events, at tree-ring ages 2345 BC, 1628 BC and 1159 BC turned out to be of particular interest as they contributed to debates on the Hekla 4 eruption in Iceland, dated to 2310±20 CalBC, Santorini in the Aegean, dated to circa 1670-1530 CalBC, and, possibly, Hekla 3, linked to a 1120±30 BC acid layer.
The two later events might relate in some way to the start and end of the Chinese Shang dynasty. It is equally of interest that the Egyptian New Kingdom traditionally spans the approximate range 1570 to 1080 BC. So the question arose whether these two volcano-related events could have caused widespread dynastic change.
Researchers have used information from American and Fennoscandian tree-ring records to attempt to define the nature of the 1628 BC and 1159 BC events; are they truly abrupt, as would be expected with volcanoes, or are they imposed on pre-existing downturns. Existing evidence suggests that the latter may be the case. If this is correct, it seems appropriate to ask what might have caused the downturns? This question leads logically to the speculation that loading of the atmosphere from space might be a significant factor in the environmental downturns.

__________________


L

Posts: 128137
Date:
Permalink  
 

This is perhaps the site of a devastating meteor impact in the Middle East.
The catastrophic effect from which could explain the mystery of why so many early cultures went into sudden decline around 2300 BC.
Today's crater lies on what would have been shallow sea 4,000 years ago, and any impact would have caused devastating fires and flooding.



The near circular, ~3.4 km-diameter postulated impact structure in the Al ‘Amarah marshes , in southern Iraq, is identified as the Umm al Binni lake. After the partial draining of the marshes in 1993, the lake has shrunk, and in recent Landsat TM and SPOT satellite imagery, it appears as a light coloured area, due to surface salt encrustations.

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard